ELC Teaching Trust Building

New ICE train-the-trainer courses Coming UpIntercultural Competence Training:
Using Both Classroom Techniques and Blended Learning

BERLIN Saturday 7th / Sunday 8th October 2017

FRANKFURT / MAIN Saturday 20th / Sunday  21st January 2018

 

Teaching trust-building is important when it comes to preparing professionals and students for intercultural encounters of all kinds. Our focus in doing so lies on first/second/third encounters, since often it is during the initial phase of relationships that trust-building succeeds or fails.

The topics we address in our intercultural training principally focus on ‘difficult’ FUNCTIONS which, in intercultural environments, may prevent a trustful relationship from developing. Typical examples are criticizing, refusing, giving advice, giving/accepting compliments etc. which follow different ’cultural scripts’ and, thus, have been a frequent source of culture-based misunderstanding.

Other DISCOURSE FEATURES addressed in the course are Directness, Enthusiasm, Formality, Assertiveness, Self-promotion, Personal   disclosure etc. which may contribute to mutual trust-building, or the opposite.

Critical issues connected with GENDER, HIERARCHY and CONFLICT are also addressed. Although highly sensitive subjects in any context, they bear particular risks when culture-based values, roles and identities clash.

Case studies are used to demonstrate the importance of appropriate communication both at PERSONAL and ORGANISATIONAL levels. Well-researched examples are e.g. the DaimlerChrysler take-over, the BMW-Rover merger, the LA Riots of 1992 and others. More recent examples include the AirFrance-KLM culture clash, or, as an example of successful intercultural corporate co-operation, the Renault-Nissan collaboration.

The ICE Blended Learning course includes exercises, role plays and case studies to practise a variety of communication strategies both in BRITISH-AMERICAN and in INTERNATIONAL ENGLISH which may help to establish trustful relationships in a great variety of international situations.

Contact ELC; info@elc-consult.com

 

 

 

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Yvonne Van de Pol – Train the trainer workshop: Mind, Brain and Culture

New Paradigms in Intercultural Understanding Burg Reichenstein, Germany,

22-24th February 2018

New research in cognitive neuroscience is revolutionizing our understanding of culture and mind. This creates challenges and opportunities for intercultural trainers and educators as paradigms are shifting. This workshop will introduce new research in culture and cognition that can inform intercultural training and education. It will reexamine basic concepts from this new perspective, including: definitions of culture, cultural difference, bias, language and culture, culture and identity. We will examine how these new conceptualizations are currently being applied in specific training contexts, and in the current climate of increased intercultural tension.

This train the trainer workshop is a co-creation of Joseph Shaules, Matthieu Köllig and Yvonne Van de Pol

For the Flyer click here; http://www.luzazultrainingen.nl/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/T4T_Mind_Brain_Culture_Flyer_Feb2018.pdf 

Yvonne Van de Pol Yvonne Van de Pol

 

Gary Thomas – Intercultural Business Trainer/Moderator (IBT/M)® Programme

Billed as “Europe’s most popular, most demanding and most comprehensive intercultural Train The Trainer Programme”

The Next block begins on 13th October 2017 in Freising near Munich.

For more details go to; http://www.international-hr.de/en/intercultural-train-the-trainer-programme.html 

Gary ThomasTrainer, Coach and Speaker – Gary Thomas

Film Clips – From International Intercultural Students

Tales from A Multicultural Classroom project – Films 

JAMK University of Applied Sciences, Finland

Our Tales from A Multicultural Classroom project (Tales) has it’s own channel on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6p0Wps-7OxNGSCmTTZrdVw
 
Our intercultural communication course for 1st year international business degree students and exchange students introduces a parallel workshop comprising simple video production techniques, including character development, script writing, story-boarding, shooting and editing. The results belong to the students, and they upload the videos to the channel voluntarily. We have had only one instance in which a video was not uploaded due to a student’s objection. Some of their work is shared here.
Here are a few favourites selected by Course Leader, Steve Crawford:
 
Stereofives
 
Five students from different nations try to solve the global financial crisis but run into stereotypical challenges:
 
 
Intercultural Plagiarism
 
Based on action research we conducted at our school, we discovered a phenomena we call “cheating without intent,” where students do not set out to cheat but find themselves in difficult circumstances that compel them to make bad decisions:
 
 
Dmitri’s Drama
 
A Russian student finds a difficult path to acculturation, and reaches a crisis point:
 
 
Lisa’s Acceptance
 
Newly off the press… A young girl discovers something new about herself in Finland:
 
 
A Cultural Deal
 
A Finnish girl finds herself in Italy to close a deal, and returns home empty-handed. (this video is often used with our critical incident analysis tool)
 

Pune, India – Intercultural Competence 4.0, 17th-18th February 2018. Call for Papers.

SIETAR India Intercultural Competence 4.0

SIETAR India Intercultural Competence 4.0

Sunita cordially invites you to submit your intercultural abstracts to present a 60 or 90 minute interactive session or give a 20 minute TED style talk.
Do please send your submissions to sietarindia@gmail.com by 30th September 2017.
Thanks from the the Sietar India team
Sunita Nichani
President, Sietar India

Deeply Disconnected: Our public and private selves (and our brains) in the age of continuous connectivity with Sue Shinomiya

A film of the Webinar

Creating connectedness – with myself, among people, in the world – is one of my deepest desires. As practitioners, we share a responsibility to bridge across cultural differences and bring people together. And yet, all too often, I experience the exact opposite: feeling deeply disconnected. Why does it hurt so much? It doesn’t help that the boundaries and parameters around what is private and what is public seem to have shifted. Is “sharing” the same as connecting, and have we become addicted? The social media and technology that’s supposed to connect us has also made us keenly aware of stark differences. For me, for our community, for humanity, and for this planet, disconnection in an interdependent world is not sustainable. How can recent neuroscience discoveries inform us about the complex social and emotional dilemmas that we face, especially as we navigate and bridge across cultures and differences? In this talk, we trade stories, new theories, ideas and reflections, and ask some thought-provoking questions for you to ponder.

See the film at; https://youtu.be/cjaFtBM2vqQ 

About the Speaker Sue Shinomiya

Ms. Shinomiya, MBA, of Global Business Passport empowers global professionals to connect, lead and succeed across cultures and differences. She is a leading expert and published author on Japanese culture and business. Her current work includes high-energy, engaging programs – live and virtual – related to Asia, North America, Latin America and Europe, as well as a range of business programs on leading and getting things done effectively and respectfully in an increasingly global, diverse and complex world of work. She is currently an Adjunct Faculty Member of Portland State University’s Masters in International Management program, and has enthusiastically served on the Board of Directors of SIETAR-USA.

Quote from Sue: “I firmly believe in the power of connecting with others, respecting both similarities and differences, as a means towards creative achievement, and a broader, more fulfilling human experience.”

Sue Shinomiya

Interculturalist and Japan Expert Sue Shinomiya

We hope you enjoy the film.

The Journey to Harmony in a Small French Town – The Story of Mozaiq with Natalie Lutz 

A Film of the Webinar

This unique recording tells the story of turning a small French town experiencing local attitudes of division, hatred and fear into a more harmonious community displaying cooperation and healthy levels of co-existence.

Listen to Natalie’s tale as she experiences push back, frustration and resentment before finally breaking through to something worthy and, possibly repeatable, in YOUR town too.

Natalie Lutz

Interculturalist Natalie Lutz

About the Speaker – Natalie Lutz has been helping executives and international corporations understand cultural differences and work effectively together for over 25 years. Born and raised French-American, she is bilingual, bicultural and has lived in 4 countries. She trains consults and facilitates sessions on:  Working in a Multicultural environment, Leadership, and Expatriations to France and the USA as well as Team-building.

In 2010 she created and co-founded Mozaiq, an association dedicated to celebrating diversity in a small town outside of Paris. Each year she and her team put on 4 events including a Diversity Day which repeatedly draws crowds of more than 700 participant

To access the YouTube film click here; https://youtu.be/F6lUGzWikEg  

Hard Sweaty Workouts – A Cultural Metaphor from Malii Brown

A film of the webinar – Malii has developed an idea that borrows from the sweaty physical space of the gym and applies it to benefit a diverse group of people working together and wishing to raise their level of cultural competence as it shows up in process, inclusion and equity. She is talking to YOU.

In this one-hour film (no yoga mat required), Malii expands upon her creative ideas and tells us how high-intensity interval training can be learnt, practiced and applied to good effect. So grab a pen, paper and your water bottle and plug in to enjoy this unique intellectual and emotional workout.  Click on the link to watch the film now; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPXVXAXh0oI

Malii Brown

Speaker and Trainer, Malii Brown

About the Speaker – Malii Brown is a trainer and consultant working globally and stateside to equip people with skills to manage the complexities and opportunities inherent to work and life in culturally diverse environments. She has 12 years training experience including Fortune 500 companies, institutions of higher learning, state government and nonprofits.

Malii offers a unique perspective to cultural work as a Millennial woman of color who has worked and travelled throughout the U.S. and 20 countries across Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. She has varying proficiency in English, Spanish, Japanese and American Sign Language (ASL) and holds a Master of Arts degree in Intercultural Management from SIT Graduate Institute (School for International Training) in Vermont, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Diplomacy and World Affairs from Occidental College in California. She now lives in Chicago.

 

Film of ELC Webinar; Identity – Values – Language – Culture? Methods and Materials for Teaching Intercultural Competence in English

 

ELC Screen Jpeg

To watch the film click here; https://vimeo.com/224431112

Dr. Judith Mader and Dr. Rudi Camerer Broadcast from Frankfurt on the schools of thinking around culture, where the problems lie, effective blending learning methods, the use of critical incidents and case studies and how a combination of “home” work and classroom discussion for individuals or groups can work successfully.

If you enjoy the show and want to experience the ELC ICE course for yourself, feel free to contact Rudi at; R.Camerer@elc-consult.com

Cultural Risk Management Part 2 by Glen Burridge: Deadly Assumptions

Now, I hope I started to frame this last time, but let’s take that first assumption and look at some practical evidence of why it needs dispelling. This won’t be the normal size of my blogs. This is just too important an subject. But stick with me….

Assumption No. 1    “This topic has little or no effect on my world: I have more important things to worry about”

This is so big I’m going to break it down into two parts.

Part I: Every Human Grouping Has a Culture

Let’s start with internal culture, the one that exists in every grouping or organisation of human beings on the planet. This is the aspect most people are familiar with.

In the world of business, the evidence of its importance is legion and its consequences run from operational ineffectiveness through to life and death:

  • In a 2008 survey of more than 1500 industry executives, IBM found that roughly half of all projects fail due to “company culture”

http://www-935.ibm.com/services/us/gbs/bus/pdf/gbe03100-usen-03-making-change-work.pdf

  • Deloitte ‘Core Beliefs & Culture’ survey from 2012 illustrates the power a corporate culture has on how happy and valued employees feel:

https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/global/Documents/About-Deloitte/gx-core-beliefs-and-culture.pdf

Exc orgs 

  • The Final Report on the Investigation of the Macondo Well Blowout by the Deepwater Horizon Study Group (2011), one of the worst industrial accidents in of recent years:

“It is the underlying safety culture, much of it so ingrained as to be unconscious, that governs the actions of an organization and its personnel. [These are] cultural influences that permeate an organization and an industry and manifest in actions that can either promote and nurture a high reliability organization with high reliability systems, or actions reflective of complacency, excessive risk-taking, and a loss of team situational awareness.”

http://ccrm.berkeley.edu/pdfs_papers/bea_pdfs/dhsgfinalreport-march2011-tag.pdf

We also know that increasing the variety of the people who make up an organisation, in terms of the most fundamental traits, has a positive impact:

Diversity

http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/why-diversity-matters

And you don’t have to take my word for it, listen to what these two men have to say about the topic of organisational culture, who know a thing or two about running a business….

“The only thing of real importance that leaders do is create and manage culture. If you do not manage culture, it manages you, and you may not be even aware of the extent to which this is happening”

Edgar H. Schein. Renowned American organizational psychologist, Emeritus Professor of Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management

“Culture eats strategy for breakfast”

Peter Drucker. 20th Century business management guru and writer

The ends might be different, but the same undoubtedly goes for the public sector and our governments. Any listing of the largest organisations on the planet,

e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_largest_employers

is dominated by state-driven entities. Just contemplate the complexity and cultural diversity – in every sense – of a collection of several million employees represents for a moment. By any standards, these are equivalent to nation states in themselves. Even a several thousand employee organisation will have its own clans, power struggles and centres, outlying regions, dialects and a clear sense of norms and networks of communication and action.

Part II: When Worlds Collide

For an organisation that remotely cares about its interaction with its operating environment, it’s very tempting, especially for a commercial entity, to simply state that what’s important above all is their relationship with their customer(s). This makes complete sense…..on the face of it, but the correlation between corporate health is mixed, as examples:

The truer reality is any organisation, whether public or private sector, sustains its existence with its overall relationship with its operating environment.

Crudely speaking, it is fed by a demand from within that space, whether it be from a market or a power centre. Its survival may assured through various means: extracting profits, exchanging goods, offering expertise, a social contract, acting on behalf of a governing mandate or through distributing services altruistically, among other things.

Whatever your organisation does, it will inevitably be interacting with others, no matter what your or their motives. And each will possess a culture(s) which will never switch off, constantly interplay and collectively shape a new reality.

The trouble is that if you ask a random person on the street what “inter-cultural relations” are, chances if they have the patience, they’ll figure out more or less what it should mean. However, except for those working in certain fields, it’s far less likely to be something they systematically think about much and there is even less chance they claim it as an area of expertise deployed on a frequent basis.

Even those who are consummate interculturalists most likely don’t name it and will often put it down to “good personal qualities” or the like. The idea that groups they belong to are actively engaged in such issues will take some head scratching. Even though the consequences may be very apparent to them, only if pushed, are they likely to bring the C-word into it. And don’t be surprised if – even if you get here – when they refer to culture, they will be exclusively talking about ethnic or national ones (…we’ll get to that, in a bit).

It’s not that Culture isn’t ever-present or of capital importance, it’s that most people are simply not taught to frame relationships in intercultural terms, which is tragic since its master practitioners literally save the world or, at the very least, your world every day. Each diplomat who recognises that the point being made in a treaty negotiation stems from a deep-seated historical perspective born of an ancient sleight, each business person who realises that a sale needs to occur in a certain pattern to gain trust in this market, each presenter who outlines their arguments in a way which reaches out to a colleague from another discipline…..they are all making the world an easier place to live in and moving forward human progress. Belligerent, selfish or malignant actions taken in the world are, by definition, anti-intercultural in that they drive away mutual comprehension and productive co-existence.

Yes, I told you this stuff was important, didn’t I?

Maybe it is my training as a geophysicist, but I like to think of the inter-cultural relationships acting as a wave-field. Like the sun’s energy that bathes us, culture is something we are constantly bathed in. The spectrum frequencies change slightly with every moment, but it is inescapable and complex, but if you make an effort to understand it, it is something you can harness for all sorts of good.

We’ll get back to what goes into that ocean of waves, but for moment I just make one plea – don’t limit your thoughts on this subject to flags, languages or belief systems. There are complete strangers you can meet from the other side of the world who you will have instant an instant cameradery with, based on affinities that go well beyond those factors. Have a think….

Now, if you still don’t think this subject is of capital importance, take a look at this list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cognitive_biases

Culture plays a significant and inescapable role in pretty much any one of these effects that warp and shape our activities. Go through any of them in your professional life and see if you can think of an event where you saw this effect in play.

And now, count up the cost…..in money, reputation, uncertainty and RISK.

Billions of $’s in accumulated financial losses have resulted from not adequately addressing for this element of risk, hard-earned standing and reputation has been dissipated and yes, many lives lost. And what’s worst is that it, if deployed, it presents one of the greatest opportunities for all-round gain and it is sitting in plain view to any organisation that decides to engage with it.

That’s where this concept of Cultural Risk Management sits, right under each of the human behaviours that influence the full sweep of your organisation’s operations.

Talk to the AuthorGlen Burridge. For a discussion of the topics raised in this article and associated blogs, please feel free to get in touch with Glen at glen@glenburridge.com or via LinkedIn.