Event – Conscious Use of POWER, 29th November 2019, London.

Join The Inner Activist to understand your relationship to power. Build capacity and connection within the communities you serve!

Come get involved…


About this Event
How we are in the world, how we relate, collaborate and lead arises in part from our experiences with power. Power can be a negative force, creating division, polarization and systems of oppression, or it can be a source of personal growth and collective transformation within our communities. Conscious Use of Power deepens our understanding of the conflicts, polarization, and feelings (such as anger, pain, guilt, helplessness, apathy and despair) caused by abuse of power and the resulting trauma. We explore the development of our social identities, both marginalized and dominant, as sources of strength and wisdom, and as places of deep wounding. Practices to get us ‘unstuck’ and help us tap into our psychological and spiritual power will free our capacity to build relationships across difference and to consciously use all forms of power to resource ourselves and our communities. Together we work to support the inner and outer changes which build solidarity, allyship and collective power.
***Learning outcomes***
Establish the relationship between inner work and leadership for the benefit of the communities you work with
Understand the various sources of power from psycho-spiritual to systemic and how they surface in social and environmental justice work
Explore your personal relationship to power – how does it shape your lived experience, how do you use it to impact the lives of others?
Identify skills to build relationships across difference (race, class, gender, ability, etc.)
Discover tools and practices to resource yourself under pressure to respond to challenging situations
Who is this workshop for?
We invite participation from individuals who have a foundational understanding of anti-oppression and how systemic power dynamics such as colonialism, capitalism, and patriarchy have shaped the world around them. This workshop is open to:
Grassroots activists and change makers
Non-profit and Charity sector
Students and individuals interested in social and environmental justice
Registration fee
The Inner Activist prioritizes reducing barriers for program participants. One of the ways we do this is through a tiered fee model. We invite you to consider principles of self-determination and equity as you choose your tier.
£20 – Supporter (support others as well as yourself)
£10 – Sustainer (pays for you)
£5 – Community (discounted)
About The Inner Activist
The Inner Activist’s mission is to co-create learning spaces that develops compassionate, reflective and responsive leadership in individuals and communities, supporting leaders to skillfully navigate emotions, conflict, power and difference grounded in a commitment to social justice, diversity and equity. We do our work in hopes of a world where individual and collective leadership is based on justice and sustainability for all people, communities and the Earth; leadership that is self-aware, compassionate, collaborative, courageous, empowered and accountable.


To learn more, visit http://www.inneractivist.com. Get in touch with us at registrar@inneractivist.com

Book Review – The Global Mobility Workbook, by Angie Weinberger. Review by Matthew Hill

This punchy book covers the many and varied aspects of an expat move, with the momentum, depth and finesse that anyone new to Global Mobility will truly appreciate. Continue reading

Book Review “The Learner’s Journey – Storytelling as a Design Principle to Create Powerful Learning Experiences.” Written by Bastian Küntzel Review by Matthew Hill

“Identity is the story we tell ourselves”

Bastian Küntzel, Interculturalist, trainer and volunteer, has pushed himself to produce a practical book, that reflects its subject matter, is fit for purpose, and, keeps the audience engaged all the way to the end. Just like a good story.

Success – The book works. Imagine if this tome had failed to keep the reader turning the pages or left the trainer / coach / presenter more confused than when they started!

A journey to wisdom

Tone – The author adopts an intimate style with self-deprecation, revealing honesty and scattered references to Hollywood films that we all know – Harry Potter, Die Hard, Lord of the Rings, Iron Man, etc. We are drawn into this cosy fireside chat (the worked examples in the book’s appendix include old barns and wood burning stoves to add to this feeling), as we begin to join Bastian in his story and journey.

With references to the works of Daniel Kahneman, Joseph Campbell and Yuval Noah Harari, the author provides evidence that he has read widely, dived deep, and, is up to date with his sources and research. The authors are sited in footnotes at the bottom of each relevant page. A bibliography at the end would have been a nice addition.

He deconstructs their models to form his own philosophy around identity, learning, motivation and change, and, does so in a clear, rational and appealing manner.

The Hero’s Journey – We start with the 17 common elements of all stories as collected, analysed and explained by the great Joseph Campbell. With liberal reference to George Lucas who famously used Campbell’s schema to produce the most successful film franchise in the history of cinema – Star Wars, we understand why Bastian adapted the title of Campbell’s most famous work and named the book – The Learner’s Journey.

We then move to Dan Harmon’s updated and truncated model with 8 phases of the voyage.

1. Protagonist

2. Need

3. Go

4. Search

5. Find

6. Take

7. Return, &,

8. Change

The supposition is that this universal structure, found all over the world, in all cultures and throughout time, provides a robust template for training design.

To prove this point, the author spends the rest of the book matching Harmon’s stages to the student’s learning journey and suggests activities, criteria and pitfalls for each step along the way. This unique approach aims to help the classroom pupil to change, transfer and re-integrate into their workplace.

There are some fun moments – The holding of a “Fuck-up” night during an off-site multi-day training – A sort of improv, open mic session where story telling on the theme of how it all went wrong leads to bonding, positive vulnerability and the parking of egos for the duration of the course.

Criticism – Whilst the book is a light, informative and a well-intentioned effort – the model does not always fit the facts, the training purpose, or, the audience. The 3 examples at the end mostly fit but do not 100% conform to the stages of Harmon.

Audience – This book will appeal to those trainers, facilitators, teachers and coaches, that have enough experience to be able to put together a course for themselves – A beginner may be overwhelmed by having to adapt to the various stages and resign, disheartened.

Personally, I identified with the stages and found myself beginning to brainstorm activities and exercises that would fit the 8 parts and found plenty of ideas to insert into each stage.

Conclusion – This is a clean, simple and useful book that will help the passionate trainer, looking to improve or perfect their design craft to take their classroom delegate’s experience to the next level.

There are enough warnings and sorry tales contained within the pages too to act as a vicarious instruction manual for the newer designer.

All in all, The Learner’s Journey is a recommended read for the progressive and open-minded trainer who wishes to gain entry to the hearts and minds of their audience, move them emotionally, and, achieve a learning transformation that is worth reading about.

The book is accompanied by a resource centre – www.learners-journey.com and is available in Kindle and paper form.

Mind Your Language – Don’t Say That! – An Exploration Of Frustration Within International Teams. by Matthew Hill #language #understanding #peace

That is completely outstanding, wonderful and awesome.

Do the utterances of your colleagues radiate a grey pessimistic gloom that makes you want to shake them? Or, do some of your overseas team members chuck out so much insincere whooping enthusiasm, that you feel as though you may be presiding over a 5 year-old’s birthday party with jelly and ice cream?

Language

Before we leap to judgement about the passive or active language of our fellow executives and how angry this makes us feel, let’s take a breath and put this into context.

What gives us our language?

If your country had a history of keeping people down via serfdom, feudal oversight and soviet communism’s secret police – If a little war, starvation and religious persecution were thrown in for good measure, what discourse would be heard in your market square!

Too much?

Optimism – Before we totally condemn the US for their crass and trivial sounding, “Everything is awesome.” Let us pay tribute to the language that facilitated the actions of 5% of the population (USA) to produce 23% of the turn over OF THE WORLD. We may criticise a lack of depth but you cannot argue with the result.

Pessimism – Conversely, from my 5 years in Central Europe, working with a generation that followed the Soviet regime, I came to understand the cynical, dark and cautious language of the region in a new way. This different perspective freed both them and me from the energy draining depression that many expats complained about, (when they thought no locals were listening.)

“We tried that last time and it did not work”

History – When you have control and agency ripped from your arms by aristocratic overlords, then Communist apperachnics, and finally, Western corporate bosses, your language will morph into something pragmatic and functional. The Czech, “We tried that last time and it did not work” or, “There is a problem” seem to signify a reluctance or unwillingness to cooperate.

This is to misunderstand them.

When we dig deeper, we uncover a more profound truth. View this class of communication as an enquiry about your intentions. Then, relax a little, and, respect the input, regarding it as relevant and sharp. We are really hearing, “Can we trust you?” “Are you for real?” “Will you change your mind next week and so render this urgent request for action, pointless?”

The Slavic slaves will be servants no longer. Their words symbolise the overthrowing of oppression. Depth, connection and respect are required. 

Meanwhile, in the middle…

Geographically and energetically, the UK and much of Continental Western Europe fits somewhere in the middle. Our modest phrases give us away too. In response to an enquiry into our mental and physical wellbeing, the Brit may say, “Mustn’t grumble” “It could always be worse” or the anodyne and meaningless, “Fiiiiine”.

We see ourselves as free, democratic action takers, steering our ship on our own terms and yet, this passive language is manifestly pessimistic, fatalistic and, to an outsider’s ear, almost tragic.

The core cultural value that drives this avoidance of hubris and enthusiasm, is modesty – Cultural modesty. I have written a lot on this subject. The history of the British people, pre Empire, was similar to that of Russia. The surfs of the UK were a miserable, Baldrick like lot, (though he was much more optimistic!)

Here, we are signalling the tall poppy syndrome, though it is God who will smite us down for standing up and standing out, not a secret policeman in the middle of the night.

The Brit must avoid displays of ostentation and be ready for the next disaster to arrive at any time.

I spend a little time in Southern Germany these days and notice a related style. On entering a restaurant with pleasing décor, positive staff service and quality food and drink, the first comment by a local may well be a critical or negative one. Again, a self-flagellating form of avoidance – Dodging the wrath of God.

Optimism

Britain’s new Emperor (We will see if he is wearing clothes, shortly), has spoken of the need for optimism by Brits after enduring the 1000 day water torture that is Brexit.

***I feel the average Brit will roll their eyes at this, fearing a whooping American-like, forced enthusiasm with an implied command to display compulsory happiness***

We have just come out of a decade of austerity – Flogging will continue until morale improves.

Now, we are being instructed to drive the UK’s economic car over a Sovereign and “self-determining” cliff with a smile on our face. – See? I am doing it myself!!!

Go USA!

The context of US language is fascinating. Disparate exiled European groups landed on the East coast and headed out West to stake a land claim and work unbelievably hard, to try to build a cabin, plant, tend, harvest and preserve crops, and gather enough fuel for winter. 62% failed. I guess the ones that made it were using more positive and action based language than the ones that froze or returned. “Just do it” “Make it happen” “Outstanding” “I won”.

Conclusion

Language divides us.

The language of the “other” can be irritating.

We can mitigate our bitterness and animosity when listening to the message of our overseas counterpart by taking a peak at the fascinating history that helped establish their idioms, punch lines and social fillers that we hear today. And, it is by respecting the past and their past, that we can ensure a tolerant and healthier approach to the “other”, and, enjoy their language and energy today.

Now, wouldn’t that be awesome, problem-free and totally fine!

Your Voice Can Be A Valuable Asset – The Benefits of Developing and Deploying Your Voice As A CAREER Building Weapon. Talking the beautiful talk – Warbling your way to wealth – A Presentation Post by Presentation Skills Trainer and Coach, Matthew Hill #presentation #skills #voice

Voice – The Benefits
Put simply – There will be a positive earnings dividend for those who work on their voice and develop its melodic capabilities to the max. And, I am not talking about winning a TV talent show. Customers and clients would rather listen to a pleasant, sonorous voice that a scratchy, squeaky weaker one. They will stay longer, learn more from you, and, even AGREE with what you are saying! Continue reading

Do You Want To Sell Just 10 Copies Of Your New Book? No? Because, You Cannot Rely On Your Publisher To Market The Book For You! – An Author’s Guide To Selling More Books by Matthew Hill #book #author #marketing #copies #promotion #success #publishing #bestseller

How to get out from behind the desk and shake your marketing booty to create a minor book marketing sensation (and justify all the pain and suffering of writing the book in the first place.) The Numbers Over 97% of … Continue reading

Gary Thomas of International HR Offers 2 Freelearning Webinars In July #unconsciousbias #marketing

To give you the opportunity to get to know some of our topics and to give you an impression of how we work, Gary offers regular free webinars on contemporary topics. All you need to participate in our freelearning webinars is a computer with internet access. The link to register is at the bottom of this post.

The freelearning webinars are limited to a maximum of 14 participants and registration is on a first come first served basis.

Unconscious Bias – 23rd July 2019, 9AM German time / 8AM UK.

In this interactive free-learning webinar you will learn how implicit, unconscious bias influences your daily business. You will discover how your brain often tends to make wrong decisions.

Marketing for Trainers – 23rd July 2019, 11AM German time, 10 AM UK.

Many freelance trainers rely heavily on word-of-mouth without focusing on their own market position. In this webinar we will examine the components of a practical marketing and sales concept.

Action – Simply fill in the contact / Kontact form’ https://www.international-hr.de/en/kontakt/

Feeling Italian – What does it mean to be Italian? A photography and book project crowdfunded…by YOU!

More than a photobook about what it means to feel Italian today .

89 photographs selected by an international jury show images of the Italy of today. A country in transformation in a global context, in terms of behaviours, customs and values and, at the same time, a country linked to traditions and elements of continuity with the past.
The Photography Contest, Feeling Italian, collected more than 600 images of professional and amateur photographers, from Italy and abroad. A jury, composed of experts of photography, visual communication and interculture has selected 24 photographic projects .

Feeling Italian – What does that mean?


This photo contest represented the first phase of a wider research and training project, that SIETAR Italia is developing in partnership with the Municipality of Milan and other private and non-profit organizations, to promote cultural awareness and intercultural dialogue .
The book Feeling Italian will be, for SIETAR Italia and for all the supporters of this campaign, a precious tool with which to stimulate a better cultural understanding in the Italian multicultural society, and it will be a showcase for the photographers selected by the project’s international jury.
Feeling Italian : a book in Italian and in English, approx. 120 pages, with black & white and color pictures, 21 x 21cm, exposed binding, containing the selected pictures, some of the photo projects’ narratives, and short essays written by photography, visual communication and intercultural experts .

And, You have a chance to support the project by donating €10, €20 or €50 towards to the printing costs. Click on the link; https://www.produzionidalbasso.com/project/feeling-italian-sentirsi-italiani-sostieni-la-produzione-del-libro-fotografico/

Most expats don’t think they will stay so long in Switzerland

The Local’s Naomi Tsvirko interviews an expert Heike Reinhart – Internationalgermanteacher

https://internationalgermanteacher.wordpress.com/2019/05/19/most-people-dont-think-they-stay-so-long-on-switzerland/

Many language students often feel overwhelmed when learning a new language – What to do when you feel like giving up on learning German in Switzerland?

It’s no secret that learning High German in Switzerland can be difficult, but what do you do when you hit a learning wall? When you feel frustrated that the language you are learning is not even what the locals regularly speak? How do you persevere with your language learning goals?

When I first moved to Switzerland I was so excited to learn a new language because I wanted to be part of the community. As a resident of Basel Stadt, it seemed like even the Canton was keen on me learning German as I was provided with six weeks of free High German lessons.

After a few weeks of intensive lessons at A1 level, I was frustrated with the ‘full immersion’ process (you’re only allowed to speak German in class), but I was speaking basic German in a short time and I was determined to keep learning. Although my accent was terrible and the German sentence structure still confused me, I was eager to keep learning after my six-week course ended. I continued learning German on my own accord – but then things got really tough.

Learning in Basel

The teacher introduced me to difficult German grammar known as ‘German declensions’, so I decided to stop going to intensive lessons. Instead, I opted for two lessons a week and a year later after moving to Basel I am halfway through the A2 level course and am feeling very discouraged.After speaking with other international residents and my former classmates, I learned the obstacles I faced were all too common – especially for those affected by Switzerland’s new language requirements for citizenship.

Common obstacles to learning German in Switzerland:

1.    The local Swiss community speaks Swiss German, a totally different dialect to High German which makes it difficult to practice in day to day life

2.    Most people in Switzerland speak English so it’s easier to explain things in English (when foreigners attempt High German, locals often respond in English) 

3.    As with most languages, German is not easy to learn as an adult

According to international German language teacher Heike Reinhart, many of her students have expressed the same frustrations but these ‘obstacles’ should be dismissed as limiting beliefs.  “Many foreigners often give up on learning a new language in Switzerland because they believe they will return to their home country, but 70 per cent of people actually reside in Switzerland for longer than they intended. That’s why it’s important to work out your desired language outcome and not give up,” says Reinhart.

As an expert who has worked with German language beginners, she says to overcome learning stumbling blocks, language learners must realise that the process is similar to buying something new.  

Contact: Heike Reinhart /Instagram @international_german_teacher.

“You pay a lot of money for your German classes and in a sense, the journey is similar to that of buying a waffle maker. When you first buy the waffle maker you want to use all the time, so it’s exciting. But then your enthusiasm fades and slowly there are no waffles and then you stop using the waffle maker, this is the same when learning German,” explains Reinhart.  

Reinhart says for many learners the curriculum is too difficult and not aligned with the specific needs of a student: “Often what you need is not what you learn and textbooks can be grammar based and irrelevant to your needs.”

First published in the local, https://www.thelocal.ch/20190517/what-to-do-when-you-feel-like-giving-up-on-learning-german-in-switzerland

Invitation – IÉSEG and IACCM joint conference: Intercultural competencies for a disruptive VUCA world, October, Paris

We are happy to invite you to the conference of our cooperation partner IACCM jointly organised with the IÉSEG School of Management, from 31st October 2019 to 2nd November 2019 in Paris, France.

October in Paris

IÉSEG and IACCM warmly invite submissions from both practitioners and academics alike. Different contribution formats are available to suit different approaches and content, more info online here.

All submissions must be made via Conftool (https://www.conftool.com/iaccm2019), where you will be required to choose the presentation format best suited.

Submission should follow the abstract template available online, please note that there are two templates (practitioner and academic).

Submission deadline: June.2019

AND. Did you know about our available student bursaries?
Our student bursary awards are for students and early career scholars who have submissions accepted for presentation at the IACCM-IESEG2019 Conference.

Application deadline: June.2019

How to apply? All details can be found online here.

All enquiries on bursary applications (subject: student bursary) should be directed to Dr. Barbara Covarrubias Venegas: barbara.covarrubias@fh-wien.ac.at

Please like & share with your intercultural community – We’d love to see you in Paris!

best wishes,
Dr. Barbara Covarrubias Venegas
Secretary General
IACCM & Conference Chair

Conference Webpage: https://iaccm-congress.ieseg.fr