Deeply Disconnected: Our public and private selves (and our brains) in the age of continuous connectivity with Sue Shinomiya

A film of the Webinar

Creating connectedness – with myself, among people, in the world – is one of my deepest desires. As practitioners, we share a responsibility to bridge across cultural differences and bring people together. And yet, all too often, I experience the exact opposite: feeling deeply disconnected. Why does it hurt so much? It doesn’t help that the boundaries and parameters around what is private and what is public seem to have shifted. Is “sharing” the same as connecting, and have we become addicted? The social media and technology that’s supposed to connect us has also made us keenly aware of stark differences. For me, for our community, for humanity, and for this planet, disconnection in an interdependent world is not sustainable. How can recent neuroscience discoveries inform us about the complex social and emotional dilemmas that we face, especially as we navigate and bridge across cultures and differences? In this talk, we trade stories, new theories, ideas and reflections, and ask some thought-provoking questions for you to ponder.

See the film at; https://youtu.be/cjaFtBM2vqQ 

About the Speaker Sue Shinomiya

Ms. Shinomiya, MBA, of Global Business Passport empowers global professionals to connect, lead and succeed across cultures and differences. She is a leading expert and published author on Japanese culture and business. Her current work includes high-energy, engaging programs – live and virtual – related to Asia, North America, Latin America and Europe, as well as a range of business programs on leading and getting things done effectively and respectfully in an increasingly global, diverse and complex world of work. She is currently an Adjunct Faculty Member of Portland State University’s Masters in International Management program, and has enthusiastically served on the Board of Directors of SIETAR-USA.

Quote from Sue: “I firmly believe in the power of connecting with others, respecting both similarities and differences, as a means towards creative achievement, and a broader, more fulfilling human experience.”

Sue Shinomiya

Interculturalist and Japan Expert Sue Shinomiya

We hope you enjoy the film.

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