Great Presenter Top Tips – Hesitation, Deviation and Repetition – Just a Minute! by Matthew Hill

Don’t hesitate……….Don’t hesitate. Did I mention not hesitating? And, another thing…

The BBC’s long running radio parlour game on Radio 4, “Just a Minute” asks charismatic celebrities to entertain the studio and radio audience by talking for 60 seconds on a topic that is spontaneously chosen and allocated to them.

They are asked to talk non-stop with out hesitation, deviation or repetition.

But, are they right? Is this what great presenters do? And, is it what aspiring presenters should be aiming for?

NO! And, here’s why;

1) Hesitation

The pause is a critical part of spoken communication. There are 3 basic forms of silence in conversation and its opposite, interruption or overlapping chatter. Let us look at them and what they signify. A) The Northern European way – one person speaks at time, interruptions are rare and over-talking can be viewed as disrespectful. Gaps are dangerous and tend to be avoided – This is one reason why we get so many uhms and arghs in speech. The brain is desperate to fill any space that could cause a delay in delivered conversation. B) The Latin overlap – multiple players compete, collaborate and finish each other’s sentences in a display of empathy and contextual comfort. Here passion drives speech. The interruption is perceived as sympatico assistance, moving the emotion and dialogue along. Finally, C) The respectful silence of Japan or Finland, where silence is a valid unit of conversation – signifying reflection, respect and that the listener is taking the content of the other speaker seriously.

Man Giving A Speech On Stage

Silence is Authority

More evidence – I remember the opening of a large conference in Sophia, Bulgaria when a disparate group of academics, trainers and coaches came together having not seen each other for a couple of years. Add to this volatile mix, a vast spread of inviting food and good Bulgarian wine at the back of the room, and, we had the perfect cocktail for naughty schoolboy and schoolgirl behaviour and a room about to get seriously out of hand.

The courageous conference leader stood on the stage at the front and used a trick that worked. She just stood there, centred, still and silent. The naughty children (conference delegates) noticed, reacted reflexively and, row after row, sat down, shut up and paid attention.

Punctuation

How do we translate the words on the page into representative spoken form? What does a comma, full stop or paragraph sound like? They sound like a silent pause.

Action

Have more faith in silence and use it to boost your authority with the audience, give them time to absorb your wisdom, and, show that you are a confident presenter in charge of your body, your topic and the room.

2) Deviation

Whilst we are with the BBC, Do you remember Ronnie Corbett’s rambling stories, sat in that scruffy old chair every Saturday night? Appearing spontaneous, this rehearsed and masterful performance took the audience down many side roads, twists and turns – so many, you thought he would never get to the destination. What was, in fact, being delivered was a layering of content, a weaving of related references and the painting of a larger, textured story canvas. This was a mini-novel that allowed you to participate, experience and suspend your cynical perspective, as a critical and logical observer, and, to immerse yourself in the sights, sounds and smells of Ronnie’s constructed world.

Great speakers are deviants!

When you lace your speech with local landmarks and historic event or call out the last presenter’s content, you are branding yourself as a confident, present and aware performer at the top of your game, and, at ease with your core material. So, it is the drift from your script that is human, charming and impressive, not just sticking to the oft-repeated script of a keynote.

Action

Be prepared to inject a reference or two about the venue, the audience or the preceding entertainer, in order to elevate yourself to the level of super speaker.

3) Repetition.

We are told not to repeat ourselves. The irony is that repetition, and, repetition of the thing we just repeated, works. It reinforces the message, makes it stand out and breaks the listener’s ineffective patterns of remembering. Location Location Location. Education Education Education – You remember what those phrases refer to. “You turn if you want to, but the lady’s not for turning.” (No judgement.)

What?

When we speak to international audiences, it is an act of kindness to repeat key words. In a noisy environment, it is advisable to repeat key messages, and, in the army, the instructors are giving the following instructions, “Tell ‘um what you are going to tell ‘um, tell ‘um it, and, then, tell ‘um what you just told ‘um.” – Words to live by.

Action

Load up your call to action sentence with repetition and see what added response you get. You may be surprised at the benefit of repetition to your outcome.

So the skill of the BBC parlour game was, in fact, to go against what is wise, when speaking in public. Ironic me thinks.

About to present? Take action now!

Call Matthew Hill on 07540 65 9995 for a no c ost, no obligation coaching chat to boost your performance on the big day.

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Collaboration Part 1 – What stands in the way? Matthew Hill

                                    Are we making assumptions and mistakes?

Our many many assumptions only delay the building of effective collaborative structures and getting to positive team collaboration.

The assumptions about collaboration, and, how we should all be able to instantly achieve this nirvana like state, give insights into the difficulties we face, and, they often betray our cultural origins too.

In this, the first of 3 short posts, we will explore the barriers to collaboration in order to confront them, raise self-awareness and, finally, be able to put together a blueprint for effective collaboration across place, time and difference.

Teamwork and cooperation concept

What stops us from working collaboratively?

                                                10 Assumptions and Mistakes

  1. Its all about the goal – Action based organisations or individuals are all about starting fast and ending with the achievement of a goal – growth, profit or the production of a new object etc. Whilst this approach has been enormously effective (with only 5% of the World’s population, the US accounts for 23% of the World’s economy), the magic that creates collaboration happened between the start and finishing lines. We can easily find ourselves looking in the wrong place and focusing on the wrong things.
  2. Nail down the strategy – We are taking a large step closer when we talk about strategy and the HOW? How will we get there? Here, however, the focus, all too often, again, misses out the human, the relational and the emotional. The assumptions made are like an engineer in a factory – building a sausage machine, fill it with sausage meat and casings, and turn it on. We look at process and give emphasis to the technical, whilst again, overlooking the human.
  3. Measurement improves business – You get more of what you measure? Why? Because that is where you put your energy and attention. It is easy to manage activity, and compare input with output – Notice we are back with the sausage machine analogy. This risks drifting into Stephen Covey territory where we are super-EFFICIENT without being that EFFECTIVE. There is a critical difference we must become aware of. You can be driving in a super-efficient way – in the WRONG direction!
  4. Man management will get us there – So we have reached point 4. Are we finally, going to to deal with the emotional human and how we can get them to collaborate? Not quite yet! Historically, humans have been treated as muscle machines; expendable commodities whose freewill must be minimised and whose bodies must be made fast, and, whose minds must be made compliant. Take a moment and consider how obedient are you expected to be in order to continue to receive your pay? It is a little scary. There is an unwritten subtext where you must sublimate much of yourself in order for your face and behaviour to fit in.

I remember my Welsh English teacher, Taff Davies, beginning the year with exactly this metaphor. “What is the key characteristic of an efficient machine?” He asked. Silent running was the answer, he wished to extract from the class.

  1. Privilege – Do you notice who gets promoted? Class based advantage helps promote pale males ahead of others. This happens because of the two confidences – Theirs and ours.

Their confidence is drummed in – Noblesse oblige, duty, leadership, expectation (BTW – This is not a walk in the park – There is a large promise that must be delivered upon by our silver spooned chewing heroes.)

Our confidence comes in the form of preferring to deal with a middle class white male when it comes to anything important. We are ALL compliant in this skewed system.

Society has programmed us to accept a specific and prescribed minority as the dominant leaders in our community. This is historical, political and economic. We have spent much less time, money and energy working to create the conditions necessary for wider, productive and sustainable collaboration.

  1. Me me me – Either from the elite in point 5. or coming from the wide lands around them, the personal agenda of the individual can so easily compete for attention and resources as to undermine the chances of everybody playing nicely, collaborating for something worth achieving, or, the key audience being served at all. Just look at the ego of that person in your own group. You know who I mean.Collaboration - letters written in beautiful boxes on white background
  2. Defensive feelings – It is too easy to get passed people as machines model only to take everything personally. This leads to drama and personal battles that have little or nothing to do with the mission, the team or the service that is to be delivered. – Defensiveness is at the heart of most escalations, team malfunctions and litigation. It is a primal human reaction and will not lead to 1000 create collaborative moments.
  3. The oppressed marginals are included – The opposite of 5., those stuck in the margins have learnt behaviours necessary for them to exist, persist and survive. Their voice is quiet and avoids critical challenge, licenced pessimism or contributing their own innovative ideas. No risk – no punishment. That is the motto of the un-empowered came up with to keep on living.
  4. I don’t do bias – The problem with us humans, is that we think we are objective, intelligent and sophisticated creatures – That we are above the fray. We subconsciously dismiss the views of outsiders, outliers and those not in our gang. And we only vote for our own and take comfort in the tranquil voice of the social leaders as with point 5. We all have plenty of unconscious bias that has been programmed in via parental chat, education, entertainment and, particularly, with every political speech we have heard.
  1. Pleasing people pleases people – We end in irony. Groups comply rather than offer rational challenge for a reason. It is because they wish to enjoy harmony and for each member to be liked.

The assumption is that nice people, doing nice things for the needy is the way to go. It is not.

People pleasers don’t please people. We get nowhere and the wheels eventually fall off the bus. Group thinkers take wild decisions, create unsustainable levels of risk and cannot self-correct.

When we replace groupthink with licenced criticism, we start to create the conditions for GOOD conflict, robust exchange and the possibility of progress. This is challenging in most subcultures, where confrontation is actively avoided (How many times do the Brits say, Sorry, Sorry, Sorry, Sorry every day?)

Being nice is not always a necessary condition for collaboration.

Conclusion – A raft of assumptions and mistakes stand in the way of forging effective teams, committees and communities that can act with purpose, from a strong based of shared values to achieve worthy and sustainable outcomes.

Next time we look at some exercises that can get us from the 10 assumptions and mistakes mentioned above and move towards behaviours supporting full-on collaborative teams working in a robust, courageous and effective way to fulfil their mandate.

About the author – Matthew Hill is a facilitator, presentation coach and leadership trainer, working with commercial and voluntary organisations to help them operate as robust executive teams, fulfilling individual promise and delivering overall results that are extraordinary.

Lead Magnet

Come work with me…

*** SIETAR Congress in Leuven *** – Matthew Hill will be running a workshop on the second day of the SIETAR Spain Congress in Leuven. 10AM. Do join us if you can…

Matthew Hill – 07540 65 9995

How to Build Your Crowd, Tribe, List and Database (in the new world of GDPR)

Remember – No Database = No Business

Let us start with a shocker – I think GDPR is a GOOD thing for marketers.

  1. You are deluding yourself if you think that everyone on your 2500 E Mail newsletter list is opening up your monthly offering and devouring your every word. 30% will have moved on. 40% have redirected you to the Spam bin and 2% have DIED!

It is time to clean house and ask everybody still alive to opt back in.

  1. In time, effort and collateral, you are wasting real money. Imagine you budget for 10 £, $ or € per recipient every quarter, half-year or annually. If you cleaned your list, you could stop wasting £75,000 every year.
  2. When you clean your list you increase the richness, recency and relevance of your database – That is the GOLD standard for marketing professionals.
Crowd at concert

Build your crowd!

But I have just lost 75% of my list through asking people to opt back in. How do I make up the shortfall?

There was no shortfall – Those people where dead to you anyway. The more exciting question is, “How can I expand my tribe with current, live prospects that are open to my new offering, have fresh needs, plenty of money, and, have not become jaded by my recycled articles about old service X?

7 Ways to Grow your List / Crowd / Hot Prospect Database

There are at least 35 ways to legally and effectively grow you fan base. Here are just 7. (Contact me now if you want to talk about the others – matthew.hill@hillnetworks.com )

  1. The Congress Schmooze – You attend a paid conference and take your seat 15 or 25 minutes early in the main auditorium. You want people to have started to flow in – not too many and not too few. Then, pick a crowed row – Not a full one and not an empty one. Squeeze past a few and sit in the middle, about a 3rd of the way back from the stage. Make yourself comfortable, then, take out your smart notebook and a fountain pen. Now, look at the person on your left and say, “Hello, I’m Matthew” (It may be easier to use your own name here) followed by an expansive question – “What are you expecting to learn today?” or, “Have you looked at the speakers and selected your favourite?”

That should be enough to get you into a meaningful conversation. Steer this around to customers, outcomes etc. Do not offer your card first. Wait to be asked for yours. That will leave a much better impression.

Then, repeat on your right-hand side. Simple.

  1. LinkedIn Group Comments and Posts – When you know your stuff, you can seek out the right LinkedIn groups. Too big and busy and your work will get lost. If the group is tiny or dead, nothing will come back to you. Ideally you want 5,000 members and 5 or so posts a day, in your niche and with decision makers mixed in with the ambulance chasers.

Now either post some short punchy value in the form of a list article, story or a lesson learnt. When a credible person likes or shares your post, send them a connection request and hook up. Next, enquire about them and their needs. Do not be too pushy. There is nothing worse than a nice person connecting with you, only for you to pester them immediately like a high street charity mugger is a coloured vest. The aim is to smoothly take the relationship off line and build up to an exploratory call.

  1. Keynote Speech – The number one converter of cold strangers into contacts and instant customers is a great, structured, keynote speech – preferably with a Call To Action CTA at the end, a Product4Prospect exchange, or, a clever way to get engagement and permission. When done well, the result will be a rush to the stage. And, you will hear the magic words, “I want what you have for my team and my company.”
  2.  Giving Out Money at a Trade Fair – I experienced this at Olympia a few years back and it worked well. It was simple and left me feeling really good, not super irritated.

cioccolata da 50€ - vista a

I was walking down a line of exhibition booths and an older guy said, “Hello, would you like some money?” This was done with a calm charm so as not to creep me out. I laughed and was invited into the booth, across the threshold (clever) to a table at the back. Of course it was not actual cash – instead the entrepreneur had found chocolate banknotes of a high denomination. He had carried on the pretence in a light hearted and fun way. Reciprocity kicked in and, of course, I asked all about his business. We exchanged cards and I felt really good about our encounter. I have used of version of the chocolate money method myself and given away prizes of “money” as a warm up during interactive speeches.

  1. High Contact Voucher – This one works – both incentivising a cold prospect to take action and qualifying them in as a valuable potential customer. When you offer a live consultation on a hot topic of the day, you excite the right people to take action and discourage the wrong people to take up your valuable time. If you offer a 15-minute session, you can cut your losses with the non BANTs (No Budget, Authority, Need or the right Timing) and extend your call duration with hot prospects.
  2. Referrals – One of the best ways to expand your tribe with quality additions is to capture your existing customers at the PEAK of their happiness and ask them to think of peers and contacts that they have, who would benefit from your service just as they have. When you engage them at their emotional high point they will want to give you value in return. Push a little and get them to give you 5 names.

Then,

You can provide your beaming customer with a script to help them introduce you as saviour and helper. The best advocacy advice was written by star coach, Nic Rixon, who said a super sponsor told their contacts to “Do as Matthew says and pay whatever he asks!”

  1. Social Media High Value Webinar – When someone registers for your webinar, this doubles up as a GDPR compliant opt in. Just make the webinar of extraordinary value and promote it, via the most relevant LinkedIn groups with a punchy headline and long super copy body (If you need help with this, just call.)

I hope you have enjoyed this quick read and are moved to take action for yourself. Please share, and forward this piece to others who could benefit (Point 6!!)

About the Author – Matthew Hill generates new international customers for his work as a keynote speaker, trainer and coach and loves to share his methods with other leaders, soft skill coaches, public speakers and corporate trainers. If you wish to learn more, contact Matthew via E Mail; matthew.hill@hillnetworks.com

 

 

 

 

“Coaching with career and AI in mind” A new book by Coach and Interculturalist, Adina Tarry.

Finding your space, being resourceful and keeping optimism in this expanding digital age.

This intense and packed book attempts to bring together a cross-disciplinary view linking the individual to the wider context of the modern digital world, as we face new challenges and opportunities in our working life, in a world in flux, impacted by technology and at the cusp of the 4th industrial revolution.

screen-shot-2018-08-02-at-08-43-58.png

Coaching with Careers and AI in Mind.

Adina Tarry shares with us her experiential findings from more than 2500 hours of coaching with over 600 individuals. She explores key themes such as: personality, invisible drivers and values, age, personal branding and working internationally. Tarry employs research and scientific models to support her experiential findings. Probably the most useful part of the book is her digest of a large body of research on the wide impact of artificial intelligence and robotics, not only on work but also on education, governance, regulation, society and capitalism itself. All this is pitched at the individual, outlining their options in this wider system.

No book is perfect and this one could be seen as overly ambitious, attempting to tackle a vast array of subjects in a limited space.

How does it end?

The last chapter, far from being pessimistic, presents a constructive view of the future, shouts out a call to action and contains an optimistic message for the building of a resilient and flexible self, able to work through the changes and volatility that is coming.

Adina seems to have softened some theory and case studies to make the book readable, digestible and applicable. The narrative is in plain language making it accessible to both interculturalists and a wider audience – students to professionals, coaches, parents and HR practitioners and psychologists – anyone who takes an active interest in the way their working life is going to change in the future.

Overall, Adina Tarry’s book provokes thought and feeling in equal measure and is a practical tome that will certainly help those helping others or whom, personally, are moving through transition or doubt in their careers.

Getting the book

Follow this link: https://www.routledge.com/Coaching-with-Careers-and-AI-in-Mind-Grounding-a-Hopeful-and-Resourceful/Tarry/p/book/9781782205838

About the Author.

Adina Tarry is a Romanian born Coach and Interculturalist, who having lived in 5 countries, now works in London.

Coach and Interculturalist Adina Tarry

10 Presentation Crimes That Your Audience Will Not Forgive – and What YOU can do to stay F-R-R-E-E-E by Matthew Hill

Be Arresting. Don’t Get Arrested!

Having sat through 20+ presentations and talked to fellow audience members at a Congress the other week, I thought I would turn the sometimes tortuous challenge of staying calm sitting in the audience into a What Not To Do List and provide better ways of catering for your audience’s basic Human Rights.

Presentation Skills Course Matthew Hill

Sorry, Urh, hang on a minute…

Normally – More than 65% of the presenters are good and about 10% are excellent – However (always a warning word) however, some seem to be living in the ‘90’s before TED and all those great YouTube videos that clearly spell out how to get audience engagement and knowledge transfer RIGHT.

10 Crimes – The Charge Sheet

1, The Presenter Panics and Runs – Whether thrown off balance by technical issues, a late start of not having rehearsed against the clock, many presenters, including Key Note Speakers manage to get into a sweaty nervous panic during their talks. When you speed up at the end of your slot, your audience know something is amiss. When you admit that time has got away from you and then do not adjust, the audience become anxious on your behalf and when you say, “I will stop now!” 4 times without finishing, the audience will condemn you to presenter hell in your presence. The cost to you of presenter panic is having an audience close their minds with a slamming sound as the barriers drop preventing any further transfer of value. What a pity. What a waste. What a misspending of all that preparation time.

ANSWER

If you rehearse against the clock you can measure your content against the allocated time and therefore regain control. Additionally you may have a section that you can jettison if you experience a time scare. Not right at the end but 50 or 60% of the way through. Also, keep your piece simple enough for the time allocated. A 90 minute monologue simply doesn’t work in 2018 and 20 minutes is not enough time to outline splitting the atom or finding a cure for world hunger.

When you feel scarcity – SLOW DOWN – This will give you time to think, look cool in front of your audience and present the appearance of being in control. We will repeat this later – Your Audience wants you to SUCCEED.

2, Voice Crime. There is nothing worse for the speaker or the audience than someone sat at the back shouting, “We can’t hear you”, ”Please speak up” or, “We can’t hear you at the back.” Beside thinking that they should have turned up earlier and found a better seat, this will distract you from your delivery, dilute your message and divide the audience into those who join in the bullying and those that start to pity you. Both groups are not doing you any favours. Add to the crime sheet the monotone presenter, the mutterer or the huddled script reader and you have a case ready for prosecution.

ANSWER

Singing lessons – Yes, I am serious. If you wish to project your voice, if you wish to raise your volume, if you wish never to loose your voice again during a presentation, join a choir or take individual singing lessons. It will do wonders for your voice quality, your confidence and your connection with the audience.

3, Technical Failure To Appear – In today’s halls and venues, we were treated to the latest and the best equipment but – the presenters with older computers will not always have an HDMI slot, not all corporate trainers have worked with touch screens before and  new Prezi users do not all have enough practice with the application (presumably because they had spent all of their allocated tech time figuring out how to MAKE their first Prezi presentation and had not left enough to practice their show in realistic conditions.) The results were PREDICTABLE. Embarrassing faffing, asking the tech crew for help, delaying the start of the show and demonstrating the presenter’s flaws to the audience before they had managed to accumulate enough credit to afford to appear vulnerable.

ANSWER

Keep your technical level of presentation one level below your technical level of competence. Have a Plan B and back up your data. And don’t expect your venue to have usable WiFi, don’t expect to run YouTube clips live – record them and load them as MP4’s. That way they will run on just about anything. It is the most inexperienced presenters that tend to be the most technically ambitious. Those that have given a few webinars know to expect the unexpected and are able to manage the disruption in technical service with a cool head, an even voice and a smooth transition to the next section of the show.

presentation skills coach matthew hill

Too many words… take him away.

  1. Murder by Slides. The Geneva Convention states that PowerPoint slides must not have more than 20 words on them. Despite this, we see endlessly wordy, small font decks with no visuals, no colour and no useful transfer potential to them. The audience can either ignore the slides or ignore the presenter and start reading the slides for themselves. A lose-lose.

ANSWER

Separate out the desire to present and the need to transfer data and make some tough decisions before you get to the venue – What will you project with your voice and what data will you MAKE AVAILABLE AFTERWARDS in the form of a hand-out / appendix or further reference materials? Understand that slides can be pretty placeholders, a mechanism to reinforce your message with visual people and a good place for graphics, a pie charge or a simple model. However…nobody wants to multi-task during the show so STOP torturing them and plan your information flow more considerately.

  1. Methodology Overdose – Closely related to the point above, in a non- academic context there is ZERO need to reveal the statistical significance of your raw research. The audience have one question for you; WIIFT? What is in it for THEM? How can they apply your experience for their benefit? END of.

ANSWER

As above – offer an appendix, a data hand out or a lab session demonstrating your methods, approach, analysis and technical findings. AND – in your short presentation tell them the interesting bits. How it worked, what the conclusions are and how it can be applied for gain.

  1. The Presenter Got High – Audience Altitude – Finding their Level. There are two crimes here – going too high or staying too low. Both ways will crash your presentation vehicle. If you pitch it too low for too long, you will build up an irritation in your audience that will result in people leaving your talk with a noisy banging of doors or firing sarcastic questions at you that interrupt you and undermine your credibility.

It you pitch it too high the crowd will turn into a Zombie Apocalypse before your very eyes. Take this as natural feedback telling you that you failed to do your homework, identify your audience segment and that you omitted to refine your message enough to hit the target.

ANSWER

Do your homework, speak to some people, interview the organisers and don’t take general answers for the truth. Your job is to engage, inform and entertain. Your job is to tell a story. Your job is to move people intellectually and emotionally. Your job is to prevent suicidal thoughts rippling through the front row.

  1. If It Pleases Your Honour – Time Management – We have dealt with the panic of starting late, not checking the length of your presentation and of lying about when it will end. This aspect is more about the cultural differences in the perception of the flow of time and gaining explicit permission to tell your story. At the beginning of your talk you have 30 seconds to win the hearts and minds of your audience! If you fail, then the rest of your talk can only do damage – to the hopes and dreams of your audience and to your REPUTATION. When you win their support quickly, you will be given 5 minutes grace … to win their enthusiasm for the next 15 minutes! Do you see how it works?

ANSWER

Hit them hard at the beginning – fire a big gun – a moral question, a challenging fact or a brutal prediction – engage your audience and ask, “Do you want to hear more?” They will then award you explicit permission to continue. Really. This psychological contract will become stronger the more they engage with you – the great presenter.

  1. Straying From The Straight And Narrow – There are two ways to leave the path here – audience drift and speaker drift. The former consists of being caught out or taking a side bar because of an audience intervention – through being nice and respecting the audience or the influence of a strong personality sat in the second row, you drift off and ANNOY everyone else. Pleasing a strong personality is not a winning strategy for the whole audience. OR, you get on to your pet subject, leave your own path and start busking (the phrase for making it up as you go along) much to the irritation of the linear focussed listeners in front of you. When you start entertaining yourself, you automatically disrespect the sensibilities of your audience.

ANSWER

Learn to assert yourself and police your audience – Putting a hand up and saying, “Let’s get back on track” is normally enough. If you are likely to wander away from your presentation pathway, build in milestones to remind yourself of the key points that you must make. If you find yourself drifting too wide of those marks, apologise and return to the point.

 

presentation crimes matthew hill

Out of Date Material – Arrest that presenter!

  1. Criminal Exhibit A – Old Material – The older your material, the greater the chance that the audience will have encountered it before or, and worse still, they will have encountered you before, saying the same thing. There is a famous Dutch expert who basically has one keynote speech. Whatever you engage him to speak about, out he will come with his one keynote speech – And it is difficult to get a refund sometimes.

ANSWER

Read, listen and watch. Be present to developments. Watch out for shifts in the direction of your specialist subject and keep your presentation approach fresh, present and alive. It is not a crime to renew your perspective, challenge YOUR OWN beliefs and treat your audience to something EXCITING and challenging.

  1. Old Lag – You Are Not Enjoying It. The voice in your head starts to unsettle you, “Are they really listening to me?”, “ Do they believe a word I am saying?”, “Do they think I look pretty / handsome?” We can develop all sorts of complexes or simply become bored with our own style or topic when we have been presenting too long and need an upgrade – even the best can suffer from imposter syndrome, delusions of paranoia or become completely immune to the charm of their own material and begin to doubt its power to impress.

And. If you are not enjoying the show as a presenter, you can GUARANTEE that the audience are suffering too. Is it time to hand yourself in to the authorities?

ANSWER

At the beginning of any performance it is a safe bet to assume that the audience want you to DO WELL. They are actively looking for signs that you are relaxed, comfortable and up for this. They want to you to win. At the beginning you can assume that most of them LOVE you. All you have to do is not let them down (too badly.)

It is time to work on your material, work out who your ideal and appreciative audience will be and to work on your delivery, presence and voice so that YOU enjoy the show and THEY benefit from listening to you? Is this the time to seek professional help – a presentation advocate to defend your actions and get you off the charge of being a criminal presenter so that you can walk into your next speech a Free Person?

presenting

I sentence you…

The Judge’s Summation

With a little planning, anticipation and rehearsal, you can avoid cabbages and rotten eggs flying through the air, the tarnishing of your reputation as a speaker or hearing negative mumblings as you leave the building.

Remember, presenting represents the single most powerful opportunity to engage with and impress people that you have never met before. Please respect the audience’s patience, attention span, their need for structure, their appreciation of a good story AND their desire for a confident performance from you – THE SPEAKER (defendant.)

I wish you well with you next presentation…

I sentence you to 10 hours Community Presentation Practice – You are free to go…

 

About the Author – Matthew Hill is a Presentation Skills Coach (amongst other things) He works with ambitious professionals who need to impress and desire to be better. Feel free to contact Matthew on; 07540 65 9996.

 

Independant Trainer Webinar – Getting Growth in 2017

What will you achieve in 2017?

We have 3 Questions for you – What are the Biggest barriers STOPPING you growing your trainer / coaching business this year? Where does it continue to go wrong? AND How can you get it right?

Group Of Young Business PeopleWill you grow in 2017?

These barriers block critical activity, necessary organisation and positive dynamism (we fall into the trap of doing stuff that PREVENTS rather than produces growth.)

  1. ACTIVITY– What did you do in 2016? Send your profile / CV out to known training providers, put up a basic (non optimized) LinkedIn profile and attended local chamber events with other service providers where you failed to engage with business decision makers? And what results did you get? – A new sub contract relationship that provided 7 training days? A two day training or 3 new coaching customers? AND – Was that enough growth for you?

With your energy invested in more proactive and interactive methods you will generate interest, passion and action – the phone will ring, live opportunities will land in your inbox and your business will grow – You will experience meaningful cash-flow, more hour’s and day’s work, a boost in your charge out rates and the choice to take or decline work, along with the self-confidence and business freedom that comes with knowing how to market and sell yourself effectively and comfortably.

  1. ORGANISATION – How was 2016? You added 74 connections on LinkedIn, collected 47 business cards and put them in your desk draw and found the physical address of 9 companies. – Did this provide the momentum you needed for your dynamic business growth in 2017?

When you know what to do and execute clever marketing and social media moves, you will gain presence, currency and relevance with actual decision makers (and- they will LIKE and RESPECT you). They will ask your advice, do as you advise and pay what you ask because they value your input and take you seriously as a coaching / training professional. AND it will have been your marketing activity that has made the difference and lead them to a positive conclusion about you and your services.

  1. DYNAMISM – How was 2016? Sitting by the phone waiting for incoming calls, checking every e mail ping and generally living on Hopium (the expensive drug that favours hope over action.)

How will 2017 be different? Will you hone your identity statement to perfection? Will you be super CLEAR about what you offer? Will you build your BRAND promise to a level where you are taken seriously? Will you know your Marketing AVATAR? Will you learn to write SUPER-COPY? Will you SEQUENCE your marketing communication to be maximally effective? Will you be ready to launch your informational attention grabbers on Social Media? Will you build a quality DATABASE with high value business contacts? Will you be networking like a HUSTLING pro? Will you master NEW SALES? Will you create a CORE MODEL that describes your offering? Will you generate enough REFERRALS to make a significant difference to your income and business growth?

AND

Will you look back on 2017 and say, “I learnt, laughed and lead my company to profitable GROWTH. What a great year?”

Join us for this 55 minute energy boosting webinar (with 10 – 15 minutes Q&A and get your business growing in 2017)

To Register click on; https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9072445755469609986 

The webinar is on Tuesday, 21st March 2017 at 7PM Paris time, 6PM London time.

Thanks and see you there

Group of diverse designers in their modern officeWe are growing!