Lucy Fogarty’s Culture Buff Games and Cartoons

Long time SIETARian, Lucy Fogarty has recently launched a company, Culture Buff Games  (to be found at http://www.culturebuffgames.com)   that develops country specific interactive cartoon-based games to help adults and teenagers learn about cultural values in a fun and engaging way. We have a suite of interactive cartoon games for British and American culture.

Lucy is looking for feedback on topics such as the use of cartoons as educational tools, the benefits of gamification, something we covered in George Simon’s recent webinar.

Culture Buff

https://www.culturebuffgames.com/#games

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Film Clips – From International Intercultural Students

Tales from A Multicultural Classroom project – Films 

JAMK University of Applied Sciences, Finland

Our Tales from A Multicultural Classroom project (Tales) has it’s own channel on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6p0Wps-7OxNGSCmTTZrdVw
 
Our intercultural communication course for 1st year international business degree students and exchange students introduces a parallel workshop comprising simple video production techniques, including character development, script writing, story-boarding, shooting and editing. The results belong to the students, and they upload the videos to the channel voluntarily. We have had only one instance in which a video was not uploaded due to a student’s objection. Some of their work is shared here.
Here are a few favourites selected by Course Leader, Steve Crawford:
 
Stereofives
 
Five students from different nations try to solve the global financial crisis but run into stereotypical challenges:
 
 
Intercultural Plagiarism
 
Based on action research we conducted at our school, we discovered a phenomena we call “cheating without intent,” where students do not set out to cheat but find themselves in difficult circumstances that compel them to make bad decisions:
 
 
Dmitri’s Drama
 
A Russian student finds a difficult path to acculturation, and reaches a crisis point:
 
 
Lisa’s Acceptance
 
Newly off the press… A young girl discovers something new about herself in Finland:
 
 
A Cultural Deal
 
A Finnish girl finds herself in Italy to close a deal, and returns home empty-handed. (this video is often used with our critical incident analysis tool)
 

Film of ELC Webinar; Identity – Values – Language – Culture? Methods and Materials for Teaching Intercultural Competence in English

 

ELC Screen Jpeg

To watch the film click here; https://vimeo.com/224431112

Dr. Judith Mader and Dr. Rudi Camerer Broadcast from Frankfurt on the schools of thinking around culture, where the problems lie, effective blending learning methods, the use of critical incidents and case studies and how a combination of “home” work and classroom discussion for individuals or groups can work successfully.

If you enjoy the show and want to experience the ELC ICE course for yourself, feel free to contact Rudi at; R.Camerer@elc-consult.com

12 Training Film Clips – Culture, Leadership and Teams – Resources For Your Classroom

Training Resource Films – Intercultural Exchange, Diversity in Work, Leadership and Coaching, Conflict and Debate & the Power of the Individual in Business.

12 Films to use in your classroom

12 Films to use in your classroom

1, Wild Tales (2014) 6 Tales of Revenge. Directors – Pedro Almadova & Damian Szifran

Training Themes; Revenge, risk taking, morality in business and relationships

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNURIZWLm1M&list=PLhbb3wdghNhRk69plSRI2BMy5aXING4G-&index=1

2, The BP Coffee Spill – Humourous Metaphor – UCB Comedy Channel Team

Training Theme – Introducing a difficult topic into the training room.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2AAa0gd7ClM

3, Morning Glory (2010) – First Meeting Scene – Rachel McAdams, Diane Keaton. Directed by Roger Michell

Training Themes; Multi – Focus orientation, assumptions about youth, change, active listening, testing authority & managing in chaos.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWrw5ogawS8

4, Recursos Humanos (2013) Rosio Manzano, Xavier Pamies, Director Juan Alvarez Llados

Training Themes, Sexual harassment, trading favours, wielding power and gender assumptions, bias and prejudice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rS7PM9AUFjQ

5, Deloitte Diversity & Inclusion in Business (2015) Deloitte University Press

Training Theme – Diversity, inclusion, values in business

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7G0OUHnCudw

6, House of Cards (2014) Frank Underwood Ruthlessness Kevin Spacey, Netflix

Training Theme – Power, corruption, manipulation & ethics

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5Ha3IWeXOo

7, Suits – A Different Kind of Power – Donna Poulson – Sarah Rafferty, Netflix

Training Theme – Alternative sources of power, female roles – defined, prescribed and actual in business.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfX_lXvi008

8, The Intern (2015) – Robert De Niro, Anne Hathaway

Training Theme – Age discrimination & diversity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6p2exVZttE

9, Erin Brokovich (2000) – Julia Roberts, Veanne Cox. Directory Steven Soderburgh – “F*cking Ugly Shoes”

Training Theme – Social status, educational prejudice and the consequences of assumptions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZMg4vFcRQs

10, Andrew Stanton (Writer of Toy Story) – The Clues in the Story TED (2014)

McGregor the…

Training Theme – Reputation, story telling & humour.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KxDwieKpawg

11, Finding Forrester (2000) Murray F. Abrahams, Rob Brown, Sean Connery. Director – Gus Van Sant

Training Themes; Assumptions about scholarship students and social status,

white privilege, institutional compliance, rules, power & race.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xSnraJOeOyM

12, Any Given Sunday (1999) – Motivation Speech – Al Pacino. Director – Oliver Stone

Training Themes – Responsibility, consequences, reputation, coaching, leadership, accountability, sacrifice, personal choice, motivation, power & salvation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_iKg7nutNY

Please share and let us spread the word.

A Big thanks to all those that contributed to this list and those that took the time to prepare the work for YouTube.

What can YOU do at the SIETAR Congress to change your life?

A Guide to the European Intercultural Event of the Year by Matthew Hill     1, Meeting people With up to 360 people attending the SIETAR Congress in Dublin later in May, There is no better opportunity this year to … Continue reading

Make your Training STICK!

15 Suggestions

I teach a number of short courses around Europe for a large organisation and like to ask my delegates which other courses they have attended and what they learnt in them. More often than not, not only do the executives not remember much or any content – they fail to recall the main course subject, especially if they took it is more than 6 months ago! Not very encouraging at the start of a fresh half-day programme.

Here are a number of insights that will help you, as trainer / coach, to assist your participants / coachees in remembering more of your words of wisdom. There may be a test later…

Young teacher working in school classroom

“Pay attention class!”

  1. Pay it forward – If the participants are asked to learn and interact in the classroom knowing that they will be asked to teach someone the key models, theories and findings, they will learn in a different way and invest in the course with a higher level of attention. When you learn to teach you learn more deeply. And when you teach you learn a second time.
  1. Learning buddies – When I train in a company building I ask, “Do you guys know each other?” If the answer is yes, I pair up the participants and give them a challenge to undertake after the training has finished. “When you meet again in the canteen of the corridor, help your learning by asking the question – what was the most important point you have taken from the training?”

When we strive to recall we recall. When we know we must recall we, again, process more deeply.

  1. Follow-up call – Add a follow-up telephone conference call one or two weeks after the face-to-face training has happened. Ask 3 simple questions in a call that lasts between 15 and 40 minutes. The questions are; A, What do you remember?, B, What have you tried from the course and it is working well? And, C, What have you tried from the course and its NOT working well? This gives the trainer a chance to find out if the messages have landed and landed correctly.
  1. If you measure before, you can measure after. You can only see improvement if you know where you started. Simple ways include either a pre-training intake form or administering a knowledge-based quiz at the beginning of the training. If an identical or similar quiz is administered again at the end, this can create a reasonable measure of the increase in learning that has occurred.
  1. Write your own summary – There are various versions of this. One I currently use quite a lot is to ask the students to collate an Excellence Charter of desirable behaviours and undesirable behaviours. I then asked them to present this back to me in a novel way. A recent triumph was a tech group who hijacked my computer and installed some software that animated the Star Wars credits and combined this with some dramatic content to prove their understanding of the material. I was impressed and we will all remember what was said.
  1. I do declare – Writing strong personal actions on post it notes and shouting them out to other people both aids memory and reinforces commitment to take the promised action. The participants are then asked to fold up the paper and put it next to money in their purse or wallet. When they are out in a bar or shop and move to pay for something they will be reminded of the training.
  1. Interrogation – By bombarding the participants with W questions, the trainer can create a modestly tense training environment where the students actively attempts to avoid stress by preparing the answers in their heads in case they are called upon. There is a limit to this method. It is not advisable to annoy a class to the point where they rebel!
  1. Mind map – It still surprises me that in 2015 many executives in Europe have not heard of this diagrammatic learning method. With a quick lesson in how to do them, it is fun to see how quickly bright executives pick up the technique and use it to reformulate their notes. This can be very effective especially when icons and colours are employed to create more complex schema.
  1. WIIFM? – The teacher and coach may boost the percentage of retention by tailoring the material to the known and specific needs and wants of the assembled learners. By honing the material and using more appropriate language and stories, the teacher’s efforts will hit the mark more frequently.
  1. Practice practice practice – With soft skills courses especially, repetition and dynamic exercises of increasing complexity can have an extraordinary beneficial effect. This is why it is good, if you’re proposing training and have some control, to ask for a second day. On the first day you apply the polish. And on the second day you bring out the shine.
  1. Sell the benefits – Related to 9. If you emphasise the positive outcomes for the individuals in the room, they are more likely to volunteer more of their attention. One fact I like to share is that, with specific courses, the diligent application of the key learning points and plenty of practice, a single delegate will experience an extra lifetime income boost of €5000,000. It is true. This fact has a powerful effect on class attitude.
  1. Review review review – If the student assigns space to review the key schematics and theories after one day, one week and one month, it is amazing how much more they retain permanently. Most people are not aware of learning decay and need to have the review time specifically scheduled and monitored by the teacher.
  1. Mnemonics and metaphors – The brain seems better able to remember when aided by dramatic tricks. At school we remembered the colour order of a rainbow by “Rowntrees of York give best individual value.” Another way is to create similes, metaphors and stories. If you can connect things to be remembered with brilliant and wild coloured associated images in motion and make them into a funny film with a jokey sound track, the facts themselves will be hard to forget.
  1. Question Time – A wonderful way of retaining learnt material is to question it in more detail after the training has finished. Searching for the topic on the TED website may throw up a keynote speaker who gives you a different perspective in just 17 minutes. This can reframe the your perspective and help you to keep more of the content in mind.
  1. Doublespeak – 15. may be a stretch too far, but I have tried it and it works. Peter Thomson in one of his three-day training sessions asked all participants to repeat every word he said silently in their head simultaneously. It feels very strange for a couple of minutes and then it seems fairly normal. Obviously your brain processes the 2 streams of words in a special way that seems to aid memory.

TEST TIME. Turn away from the screen, pick up a pen and paper and write down as many of the 15 ideas as you can remember!

Good luck.