Utrecht Summer School – Operating Effectively Across Cultures, 20th to 24th August, 2018

Jackie van der Kroft,  Peter-Ben Smit and Nicole Kienhuis bring you this high energy, interactive and important course.

Wharf level night view of Oudegracht canal in the old city centre of Utrecht, Netherlands

Night view Utrecht, Netherlands

Are you interested in and/or already working across cultures, either at home or abroad? This course will support you in operating more effectively across international and intercultural borders. You will familiarize yourself with culture as a concept, become more aware of cultural differences and you will acquire insights in how (cultural) assumptions have an impact on your own thinking and behaviour. Moreover, you will be able to use the Intercultural Readiness Check© to assess your current competencies in intercultural sensitivity, intercultural communication, building commitment and managing uncertainty. During the course you will reflect on these intercultural competences and strengthen them.

This summer Utrecht University offers you a challenging course on “Operating effectively across cultures”. Therefore knowledge about cultural differences and intercultural competencies become even more crucial in our globalizing world. Performing well in one’s own familiar context or culture doesn’t automatically equal studying or working effectively in an international context or in a multicultural team. Even though we live and work in an increasingly globalized world, in which we seems to look, sound and think more and more alike, we are faced with deep layers of cultural differences. Not only on a national level, but also in many other, sub-cultural ways: e.g. origin, education, gender, age or sexual orientation

Outcomes

• Have discovered different frameworks to come to an understand of the concept of culture
• Are aware of your own (cultural) identities and how this has an influence on how you perceive others;
• Are able to signal and describe how cultural misinterpretations can arise (intercultural sensitivity);
• Are aware of the complexity of intercultural communication and discover different communication frameworks;
• Know about the effects of your cultural background and personal characteristics on communication;
• Learned about and are able to vary in communication styles according to the cultural context, e.g. to give and receive feedback in a culturally sensitive way (intercultural communication);
• Learned different approaches in dealing with (cultural) differences
• Know about the importance of investing in relationships and networks and developing win-win solutions (building commitment)
• Are aware of the potential of cultural diversity to innovation and learning (managing uncertainty);
• Have gained in-depth understanding of your own cross-cultural qualities, possible pitfalls and ways to enhance your intercultural competences in your own international or intercultural work environment.

For full details and instruction on how to apply please clink on the link;

https://www.utrechtsummerschool.nl/courses/culture/operating_effectively_across_cultures

or Contact Jackie directly;

E: info@jackievanderkroft.nl

T: +31(0)615823786

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Intercultural Competencies Summer School – Utrecht University, Netherlands with Jackie and Yvonne

21st to 25th August 2017 ( 5 Days) – Share your Dreams

Wharf level night view of Oudegracht canal in the old city centre of Utrecht, Netherlands

Are you interested in working internationally? This course will support you in operating effectively across (international) borders. In the course you will get familiar with theories to understand culture as a concept, cultural differences and you will develop your own intercultural competences. During the course you will reflect on the following four intercultural competences: intercultural sensitivity, intercultural communication, building commitment and managing uncertainty by using the Intercultural Readiness Check©. Additionally you will develop skills, bring these into practice and acquire also insight in your personal behaviour. After this course you will be able to operate more effectively in different contexts

As we all know, performing well in one’s own familiar context or culture doesn’t automatically equal studying or working effectively in an international context and/or in a diverse team. Even though we live and work in an increasingly globalized world, in which we seems to look, sound and think more and more alike, we are faced with deep layers of cultural differences. Navigating these differences and being able to cross bridges requires developing these four intercultural competences: intercultural sensitivity, intercultural communication, building commitment and managing uncertainty.

In this theoretical and highly interactive course you learn how to become more effective by building commitment to cross these differences. In the first place it’s about becoming aware of cultural perspectives and differences. In addition, you learn how to position yourselves in these intercultural dynamics. Also we emphasize on the importance of communicating effectively in an international context whereby many different stakeholders are involved. In this course we approach the concept of intercultural communication not only as communication between people with different nationalities, but also as the interaction between people that may differ in many other, sub-cultural ways, e.g. origin, education, gender, age, sexual orientation. Half way during the course you will bring these competences into practise during the fieldwork exercise outside of the Campus.

With – Jackie van der Kroft, Peter-Ben Smit,  Yvonne van der Pol & Nicole Kienhuis

To register click on the link;

https://www.utrechtsummerschool.nl/?code=C47&type=application

The French Paradox, Part I: “Oui…mais…”, By Anke Middelmann

“Oui…mais…”, or,”Finding the Perfect Solution”

In the early years of my teaching and training career in France, I was often confronted with comments from such as: “All the French do is talk—but there’s no action” (Anglo-Saxon, North European, Indian, Chinese); “they’ve agreed to something and then change their mind at the last minute” (German managers), “they overcomplicate everything” (British), and more general remarks that “they contradict everything”, “always disagree and complain”, “are disorganized” and “cannot be relied upon”.

Man drawing a picture of Paris

Determined to find satisfactory answers, I had to look no further than the French Enlightenment philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650). And was delighted that all the above could, in some way, be linked to his theories, specifically his anti-thèse. Eureka!

Just how does it work? One of René (“I think, therefore I am”) Descartes’ main premise is that thinking should be driven by logic and rationality. His argued that “doubt is the origin of wisdom”, and that, in seeking the Truth, “it is necessary… to doubt, as far as possible, all things”. Moreover, to find this Truth (i.e., the perfect solution), “it is important to have a Method“—known as the thèse – antithèse – synthèse.

Still today, this Cartesian “method” is applied in all situations. The starting point (thèse) is straightforward—it’s the problématique, or proposition, situation, problem, or project to be dealt with. It’s the second stage, the anti-thèse, the process of figuring out the solution, that is tricky and that confounds non-French counterparts. While the British generally come up with an objective, devise a way forward, and change course if necessary, and the Germans develop, and follow, a structured approach, the French do something entirely different.

This is where Descartes’ “doubt”, or “scepticism”, comes in. Since the anti-thèse requires that everything be questioned, the French consider all aspects of an issue by “dividing each difficulty into as many parts as is feasible and necessary to resolve it” (Descartes). It means dissecting, questioning, and possibly rejecting, all angles, knowledge and facts; it is important to decide not necessarily how or whether something will work, but rather why it might not, and if an existing or initial approach is indeed best. It leads to: “Yes, this might work, but…”; “What happens if we do/don’t do it this way?”; “How about this instead of that—or something else entirely?” In working through the anti-thèse, one may retain some initial elements, but discard others, inject new facts, develop new possible approaches, and subsequently review everything (thereby repeating the whole process!) to ultimately agree (often at the last minute) on the solution—the synthèse!

To onlookers, this contradictory back-and-forth thinking process, changing minds and plans, especially at the last minute, the lack of action until a solution is considered finite, the seemingly critical oui…mais, is time-wasting, exhausting and unnecessary intellectual acrobatics. However, to the French, not leaving any stone unturned implies doing a sloppy job. As one Frenchman observed: “We cannot work otherwise, even if, in the end, we go back to our first idea.” Although complex, complicated, contradictory and seemingly disorganised, the “Cartesian Method” can be highly creative and has made France a technologically and scientifically innovative power house: the high-speed TGV train, the Ariane space rocket, Minitel (a Videotex online system that predated the internet by several decades), the Eiffel Tower, the morning-after pill, to name just a few, are all innovations achieved through the Cartesian approach.

How to practically deal with the anti-thèse on a daily basis? Understanding goes a long way: international students and managers say that just knowing that everything will take longer, involve discussion and difference of opinion, makes things less frustrating; a German manager said he now sits back, patiently observing the commotion of the anti-thèse, and reorganising his time accordingly. Non-French university teachers adjust class content to give students more time to discuss their ideas. Others are delighted that their French counterparts’ frequent oui…mais is nothing personal. And yet others see the process as a worthwhile exercise to hone their own observational and thinking skills, and to develop new ways of seeing the same issue.

I’m not saying it’s easy to adapt; just like the process itself, it takes time, patience, and mental agility. Personally, I’ve learned to listen for the oui—without the mais—to know we’re ready to go.

Anke Middelmann was born and raised in Germany, the United Kingdom and Belgium. She spent most of her working life in Belgium, the United Kingdom, and the United States, before moving to France in 2004.

anke middlemann Anke Middelmann – intercultural trainer and coach

She is Lecturer in Multicultural Management at Skema Business School, and Director of two of Skema’s International MSc Programmes.

As an intercultural trainer and coach, she provides training and coaching on a range of multicultural and intercultural issues. She regularly provides training on “Living and Working in France” and the complexities of Franco-German working for Air Liquide, Eurosport, AXA, Valéo, Bayer, Areva, Thales, Adeo Services, Dassault, among others.