Webinar Highlights – Yoshiko Kurisaki – Western Women Working in Japan.

An ITC Webinar

Japanese Culture Expert Yoshiko Kurisaki introduces the challenges and background to Japanese business as is and as experienced by outsiders including Wester Women living and working in Japan. Help for Western Women visiting and negotiating in Japan.

Yoshiko Kurisaki helps us with an essential overview of Japanese women’s presence and importance in the Japanese workplace and economy. This includes Equal Pay Day and the Gender Pay Gap.

Yoshiko Kurisaki provides us with a cultural context around the delicate subject of collectivism, silence, soft speech and the “rice economy” as an aid to Western Women entering Japanese business scenarios.

Japanese Culture Expert Yoshiko Kurisaki gives essential advice around the delicate subject of modesty in Japanese business scenarios. Help for Western Women visiting and negotiating in Japan.

Yoshiko Kurisaki talks about the etiquette required to gain cooperation in Japanese business circles.

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What knowledge and skills do intercultural trainers need and how can they acquire them?

An opinion piece by one of the most experienced intercultural trainers in the UK – Adrian Pilbeam of LTS in Bath

A recent SIETAR UK professional development event run by Cathy Wellings and me was on the theme of ‘Developing your career as an intercultural trainer’. About 30 trainers of varied experience attended. We started with a group activity organised around the responses to four questions. The first was ‘What knowledge, skills and experience do intercultural trainers need?’ The answers included knowledge and experience of other cultures, knowledge about the intercultural field, skills to be able to design and deliver intercultural training, and skills as a facilitator and trainer. A second question was ‘What practical steps can you take to improve your knowledge, skills and experience?’ In terms of knowledge and skills, attending training courses and workshops was one of the responses.

For trainers with only limited experience as intercultural trainers, often coming from fields such as foreign language or management communication training, attending a structured train the trainer course should equip them with the necessary tools to begin to be able to plan and deliver a range of intercultural courses, The alternative is attending talks and short workshop sessions spread over months and even years, picking up information and ideas in a rather piecemeal fashion.

The word Culture. Vector banner with the text colored rainbow.

What should such a structured course for intercultural trainers include?

Firstly there should be an overview and review of some of the key concepts about intercultural communication – what we understand by culture, the effects of perceptions and stereotypes, different cultural values and practices, and some of the key theories. But what is important is that these concepts should be introduced in an engaging and interactive way, using a variety of activities and exercises that the participants can later use themselves in their future courses.

A second important component is to become familiar with, try out and practise using a wide range of activities and exercises – simulations, role plays, critical incidents, case studies, group and pair work exercises, use of video/DVD/YouTube clips, and the use of artefacts and realia. They need to know when to use them, how to set them up and how to debrief them.

Finally, they need to know how to combine concepts and activities into a course, which means they need to know how to analyse a client’s needs, and then go on to design an appropriate course and deliver it in an an appropriate style.

When I started out as an intercultural trainer, it took me quite a few years picking up ideas and techniques in a very piecemeal fashion, which is why ten years ago I decided to offer a structured train the trainer course to shorten and compress the learning process. The result is a 5-day course called ‘Developing intercultural training skills’ that we have now run more than 60 times, as well as a more advanced, follow-up course called ‘Designing and delivering intercultural training’. For more details, see www.lts-training.com/ICTTcourse.htm or contact adrian.pilbeam@lts-training.com.

Adrian PilbeamAdrian Pilbeam, Author, Trainer and Trainer of Trainers

We all owe a lot to Beate Sirota Gordon – Film

Important Cultural Film  – Women’s Human Rights in Japan – An candid film about the extraordinary woman Beate Sirota Gordon and her contribution to the Japanese Constitution and Women’s Rights after WWII.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TceZiTqyZXI

Beate_Sirota_Gordon Photograph Tomoko Fujiwara Beate Sirota Gordon – Photograph; Tomoko Fujiwara

DANGER – Expat Traps

Wise Words of WARNING!

From a recent relocation training for a couple of executives going to a relatively dangerous country, we build up a useful list of the possible difficulties and risks they could face. This post provides a summary of some of the dangers your relocation executives may face and the best methods of preventing or eliminating these problems. So as not to scare you or the delegates in your relocation classes, we have kept the tone light.

On the streets

You don’t have to be Orson Welles in The Third Man to experience threat and drama downtown. And, whilst Vienna, is an extremely civilised place now, there are many cities where nearly all of the incidents in this post have happened and continue to be a possible threat.

1, The hungry policeman – on a Thursday or Friday (to build up weekend spending money) our friendly cop asks to see your passport. (This can be legitimate, and carrying a passport is a legal requirement in many countries.) The problem comes when it is time for the policeman, having seen your papers are in order, to give you back the documents. If they are scamming you, they will ask for money at this point! – This is irritating but survivable. How can you make their job a little bit more difficult?

Action – take a colour photocopy of your passport and offer this instead. Tell them that the original is in your hotel safe or your office. Say that the document is just 5 minutes away. Smile and invite them to come with you. You have made their lives more difficult, and they are likely to just move on, in search of their next, more compliant, victim.

Armed policemen

Hello Sir, can I see your papers?

2, Double identity – in a restaurant you receive the bill and put down a credit card. The person takes the bill and the card away for just a couple of minutes. 3 weeks later you end up with a €7000 credit card charge originating from Argentina – and you don’t remember buying a hand tooled leather horse saddle! Your card details have been skimmed and cloned. The waiter has used a skimming machine smaller than a packet of cigarettes and you will now have months of pain working with your bank to separate your real expenditure from the thieve’s happy spending spree.

Action – I prefer American Express – they have a famously efficient department dealing in a more dynamic and energetic way with identity theft. Of course, to prevent their overwork, never let your credit card out of your sight. Take an appropriate amount of cash out with you, in the more difficult towns and pay with that. Finally, if you have a more sophisticated and customer friendly bank, tell them when you’re abroad. This may seem a bit of a pain, but you will get credibility points and, if the worst happens, they will be more sympathetic to your case and put more energy into restoring your good name and cash balance.

3, Got to pick a pocket or two – it normally happens around the railway station, getting on and off buses and trams or in a crowd. Someone bumps into you and distracts you, and … your wallet is gone. It isn’t personal, though if you dress like a naive tourist, you haven’t helped yourself.

Action – blend in, dress down a level, avoid crowds and don’t put your bulging overfull wallet in your back pocket or an open handbag. Another nifty traveller’s trick is to take two wallets, one with $20 and out of date credit cards kept in the obvious place, and another containing your valuables in your fanny pack or deeper on your person.

4, Spiked drinks – no this is not because you are 007 and the beautiful girl wishes to take you back to SPECTRE HQ. This threat is on the increase where German, British or American executives are targeted. For some strange reason, when they are carried out of a club staggering and supported by glamorous locals, other customers in the bar, seem to think this normal cultural behavior! You then wake up in your hotel room, minus your wallet, phone and Ipad.

Action – don’t drink – only joking – look in the mirror and rate your attractiveness on the scale of 1 to 10. Go on, do it. If you are a senior executive and scored less than 6, then you are a ready target for this scam. If you have an ego, or a sales based job, these double the size of the target on your back!

But seriously – drink in the bars of better international hotels or the bars of classy restaurants, where this is a lot less likely to happen. Avoid those gorgeous women, with a slight glazed look in their eyes. You know the ones – they are sitting down near the bar looking rather comfortable. This is their lounge.

You can also buy a drink tamper test kit that detects whether your red wine has been spiked. It is pretty uncool to ever use this, but it’s also uncool to wake up naked and handcuffed to the sink.

5, Driving – if the potholes, animals in the road and winter ice don’t hurt you, then the policeman, on Thursday, stopping you for a spurious traffic violation will. See point 1.

Car theft is a big problem – there was a wonderful advertisement by the Polish tourist authorities run recently in Germany which basically said, “Come to lovely Poland – your car is already here!”

Action – park in secure underground facilities beneath the hotel where you are staying. Do not park on the street or leave valuables on display. Make sure you have a car tracking system such as LoJack fitted. Also, have a steering column lock which make your vehicle more difficult to drive away.

  1. Honey trap – again James Bond is with us. Over my career as an intercultural facilitator and relocation trainer, I have encountered a shocking number of executives who have fallen prey to being exploited by young women. Again their mental faculties seem neutralised by charm and some heavy flirtation. What follows can be video footage, audio recordings, light industrial espionage and, if they get hold of the wife’s details, extortion demands for money and favours.

A more subtle version of this is the office romance, where people in the mid-level of your organisation try to get a leg up by offering to sleep with you on a business trip.

Action – Wake up and smell the Rohypnol. Get over yourself. Read more John Le Carre and be prepared for the crazy shenanigans of international office life. They don’t find your looks, charm or lame attempts at humour remotely attractive. It is not about you. It is about your power, your passport and your bank account.

  1. The knock at the door – you may come from a culture where protection, a shakedown and Mafia business tax are normal. If you don’t, ironically, your naivete may protect you. A good friend of mine, setting up an office in Italy, was approached by such a character, in search of Kriza – protection money. The young executive did not have a clue about the subtle conversation that was taking place. He politely declined the offer, and showed the mobster out. Probably through shame, the organised crime official never called again!

Action – find out what other people in the building do, build a good relationship with your bank and insurance company. Bond with your local Chamber of Commerce and find out how the other companies protect themselves in your town.

8, Employee discontent – whilst you look over your shoulder to see if you are being followed by someone in a wide brimmed hat, a credible threat may already be inside your building. Many companies have a tiny number of rogue employees. I know one senior executive who measured staff happiness by the amount of stationery stolen per month – less paper missing – happy staff. More paper missing – better call a meeting…

A more sinister version of this happens when discontented or money hungry staff purloin data for the purposes of selling it to your competitors. This is terrifying because it represents a high level of threat, and any measures you take to protect yourself, naturally insult the loyal members of staff in your team.

Action – a lot of companies are wise to data loss threats and put in back-end systems which track user logins, data access and dates. At least retroactively, you can effectively track down the culprit and take the appropriate action.

One of the more powerful charismatic leaders I trained about 10 years ago had a method of finding culprits without electronic measures. He would stand up in front of a circle of his department and say that, from now on, anyone caught breaking the corporate security rules, would have the most severe consequences brought down upon them – all he had to do then was to look at everybody’s faces – the guilty ones would freeze, look directly at him and find themselves on a watch-list. A couple of weeks after the first meeting, he would hold a second meeting. In a similar way, he would say he was disappointed and had found the rules have been broken in the past – he now threatened retroactive punishment for past crimes – again he would look around the room and see which additional employees had developed breathing difficulties. It was a clever old school way of finding out if the butler did it.

Ripping off at night

“Where is the stationery cupboard?”

9, Bribery – related to 8, you can often detect if staff members are being bought off by suppliers by the quality of their watches, cars and holidays. These 3 items are likely to experience an illogical and sudden upgrade when bribery is happening.

Action – make a note of everybody’s watch brand, car value and holiday expenditure! I am exaggerating but only by a little. Classically, executives making decisions involving hundreds of thousands of £,$ or € are susceptible to unscrupulous approaches by suppliers wishing to gain unfair competitive advantage. Have the conversation with them. Offer an amnesty period during which time, no punishment will occur in exchange for full cooperation. It is harsh to say, but to stop a corrupt atmosphere it is necessary to sacrifice a few culprits in the early days. This is the tougher side of any international leadership role.

10 – just because you’re paranoid… We began in the black-and-white streets of Vienna, and we end in the world of espionage and politics. In various countries, politicians do not seek office for the good of the people but more, to rack up large personal fortunes. There are many examples of this and it is your job not to get damaged by them on their journey of accumulation. In the pursuit of political riches, you may be followed, spied upon, threatened or made promises that require company expenditure.

Action – stay at arms length (or further) from any politicians. Remember, you will be asked to do many things for them. It is questionable whether they will be reliable or honest in helping you when it is your turn and you need help. If you must have political contact in one of the more famously corrupt countries, it is best to be transparent and do so in front of bona fide witnesses. Above all protect yourself from scandal, blackmail and coercion.

Conclusion – we do not mean to frighten you or turn your delegates away from beginning their overseas assignments.

With common sense and a little preparation, It is possible to stay, happy, safe and honest. And guys – come on – get a mirror – you are NOT THAT HANDSOME!!!

Good luck with your relocation sessions.