Tales from a MultiCultural Classroom, JAMK University Student Films – Just Got Better!

Teaching Resource Videos Made By Students

Steve Crawford and Ronan Browne have been working hard with the students of the JAMK University of Applied Sciences, Finland, supporting them in making meaningful cultural films that reflect various themes and their own views, and, experiences.

Screen Shot 2018-12-16 at 10.00.00

The 129 videos are free to use and intended as teaching aids for your classroom.

Here is a link to the channel and an introduction by Steve Crawford.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6p0Wps-7OxNGSCmTTZrdVw

Advertisements

Collaboration Post 3 – 15 Collaborative Behaviours To Change Your Group’s Outcomes

Collaborate or Die

We are meant to play nicely, work as a team and respect each other. In Part 1, we expanded on 10 reasons why this often fails to happen.

In this Part 3, we now look at the key desirable behaviours that, when practiced mindfully and regularly, WILL produce a team breakthrough, get the group to the goal and leave everyone alive, and, at least on speaking terms at the end.

As you move through the behaviours, ask yourself, “Do I do this? “Can I start doing this?” And, “Will I step up and do this regularly?”

15 Strong Suggestions

  1. Interrupt your dark defensive moments and fill them with light.

Experienced in so many ways as sarcasm, denial, anger, avoidance and justification, defensiveness – This is the burden suffered by most teams attempting to become more collaborative and effective.

Action

Borrowed from anger management training courses, the best method is to spot the symptoms of early on-set defensiveness and divert the behaviour, diminish it or reverse it. If you are beginning to feel your blood boil, take a walk to the balcony, go smell the flowers and take your imagination to a place of cool, calm tranquillity to “reset” your body’s distracting chemicals.

Young attractive business people - the elite business team

  1. Coaching your colleagues through any resistance.

The majority of people will not instantly get behind a fresh idea or new change. They will choose to wait it out, criticise it, or, mount an attack.

Action

Here, a coaching approach can be effective as you focus inside your colleague’s head to access both their imagination and logic circuits to help them do the work of processing change and getting on board for themselves. Questions that help to create different and contrasting futures are good – “What if we carry on as we are? What are the risks of this?” “If we had 10 times the resources available, what should we do next?” “If you were the team leader now, what course of action would you recommend?” Etc.

  1. Actively listening to your concerned colleague.

The problem with teams is that the confident, privileged and beautiful get most of the airtime. And this dynamic is actually reinforced by everybody in the team – even the oppressed, the shy, or, the outsiders. The reflectors, quiet geniuses and shy analysts are not prone to speak up, do not feel they have permission to speak and, thus, do not take up their share of the microphone.

Action

Related to coaching but intruding less, listening is about getting the whole story out of the coachee / colleague. We can employ minimal encouragement – “That is important, please tell us more” “You were saying…” “And, what does this mean for our team?” Quieter members of the team may be more sensitive. If you overdo it they will clam up – Maintain a positive, still attention with minimal non-verbal, para-verbal and verbal prompts. This will be good for evening out the group’s share of voice, listening to all and including their ideas and concerns as well as counting the vote of everybody to form an inclusive group dynamic that will be effective in taking a diverse group all the way to a stretched goal.

  1. Building muscular resilience.

We can see resilience as the ability to bounce back from pressure, stress or becoming knocked off balance, AND, still being about to function effectively. In the politics of the team, possessing greater resilience can take people all the way to the top. And a lack of resilience will see someone being relegated to the oppressed group, or demoted to basic executive duties. They are sent to eat at the children’s table.

Action

Resilience comes in 4 flavours – Physical, emotional, mental and spiritual. Teams or individuals can be encouraged to participate in simple and repeated exercises to stretch and build their resilience muscles. Physical – Regular exercise, monitoring diet and alcohol consumption. Emotional – Developing the habit of experiencing positive emotions through appreciation, gratitude and laughter. Mental – Simple maths exercises. Spiritual – Practicing your faith or thinking pure thoughts.

  1. Learning to resolve difference intelligently.

It is easy to sulk, withdraw and dismiss a different opinion from your own. This actually represents a form of defensiveness and will not allow a team to become optimally collaborative.

Action

Imagine learning to reconcile difference to a level where, “I am OK & You’re OK”, becomes the default setting for the group. (We discuss a positive exception to this later).

What difference would this make to the atmosphere and energy in your team? The simplest method when two parties are on opposite sides of an argument or behaviour style (e.g. direct communicators v indirect communicators), is to reconcile the difference. We ask first, what is the benefit and contribution of each style, acknowledging that a diversity of approaches is actually NECESSARY for success. We then work on how we can accommodate those two benefits in team communications or by putting them into the project plan. E.g. direct people tell the unvarnished truth, which can be invaluable when a crisis is looming. Diplomatic indirect people keep the channels of communication open, maintain higher levels of trust and ensure the probability of long-term communication. It is easy to see that both styles are required. The task then is to design simple protocols that allow both styles to operate with respect and appreciation within the team.

Colorful 3D rendering. Abstract shape composition, geometric structure block. Wallpaper for graphic design.

  1. Two heads are better than one when solving a problem.

If you are a hammer, your default mode is to bash things on the head. Not great when changing the batteries in your watch. Again a diversity of approaches will be more effective.

Action

Practicing problem solving can be a bonding process that deepens the respect and positive emotions of all team members. Weekly intellectual challenges involving abstract problems can be a fun team building activity that is secretly growing the team’s capacity to handle complex issue, resolve involved messes, and, operate smoothly and efficiently when a live business problem comes along.

  1. Trust underpins it all.

Without trust we have defensiveness, solo silos, and Machiavellian plots.

Action

There are 3 components to trust – Ability, Benevolence and Integrity. Each must be in play to ensure positive vulnerability and promote trust in a high functioning collaborative team. Ability – Giving recognition to the skills, competence and experience of each team member is a way that quickly establishing better communication and inclusion in any team. X becomes the go-to person on subject Y. Benevolence – By this we mean that each member declares and proves that they are not wishing a negative outcome upon their colleagues. They wish to allow a beneficial or, at least, neutral state to exist. Integrity – My word is my bond. It is essential to continually keep your promises in order to maintain confidence in the overall performance of any team. If there is a weak link, the whole side will feel let down.

  1. The Licensed Pessimist.

The risk to any team is Groupthink, where a strong personality is accepted as leader and their ego expands to a level where they propose actions that represent foolhardy risk taking. The compliant and passive nodders around them, allow and encourage adoption of this fast-track route to disaster.

Action

Challenging the precepts of 7. we deliberately create a rotating and official role that allows and encourages a critical view and gives full permission for that person to voice their concerns – The Licenced Pessimist. “What if the market does not recover? What then?” “Those numbers appear way too optimistic. How did you derive them?”

When immunity from revenge and animosity is established in the group’s ground rules, the role becomes effective and essential in stress testing all new input to quickly separate the wheat from the chaff.

Team building. Group pf colleagues sitting in a circle and playing games and having fun.

  1. Holding everybody accountable.

Like a sulky child, the wayward executive defends their actions by saying – “Well I didn’t agree with the decision to go this route in the first place.” (Though they remained silent or did not actively disagree, when given the chance before the decision was made.) It is this lack of ownership that will lead to a suboptimal quality of work and poor outcomes.

Action

Asking everybody to say the word, “agree” can be enough to reduce the number of passive passengers on the bus and encourage everybody to process the information to form an active and personally held view. More people are then included in the process of building strategy, planning and problem solving.

  1. Regular Brainstorming.

Habits are quick to form and hard to change. It is easier to repeat what you did yesterday than take a different approach today in order to get a stronger result tomorrow. We are conservative, risk avoidant and take comfort in repetition. The zone we live in is far from comfortable – We stay in horrible jobs, relationships or houses not out of comfort, but out of habit.

Action

This activity will also count towards your resilience exercises. Brainstorming is about expanding the creative connections that you allow your imagination to make by expressing yourself freely. Exempt from criticism and editing, brainstorming moves in waves. There will be a burst of output, a lull, a second burst, and then a second lull. Keep going. It is often in the third burst that the gold is to be found.

  1. Turning passive to active.

What is written on the tombstone of most failed companies, “Well, we tried”. Not hard enough. Underperformance is supported in meetings and work by grey language, low energy sentences and half-hearted commitment. “I’ll try” is at the heart of all of them.

Action

Challenge sluggish, monotone responses to requests. Do not take “Maybe” for an answer. When you are asked, “How you are in the morning?”, upgrade your answer from a monotone, “ffiinne, I suppose” to, “SUPERB AND FANTASTIC. THANKS FOR ASKING.“

  1. Get rid of blame.

The best companies react intelligently to crisis, drama and adverse external circumstance. They do not start to defend, point the finger or avoid responsibility.

Action

The next time you have a company fire to put out and you follow the charter (point 15.) you will experience a difference in atmosphere and will have the chance to see the benefit of full-on collaboration in action. When people are scientific in their description of events this can be captured on a timeline. When they are objective in outlining the symptoms and measured in their analysis of likely causes, then you will experience the pay-off in investing to build collaborative mechanisms in your team.

  1. Moderation and facilitating collaboration.

The accidental hero boss can unintentionally ignore valuable input in order to maintain their hero brand. The neurotic and scared boss may shut down intelligent challenge, not because of the quality of the input, but due to their own insecurities. And, the time-scarce leader can move the meeting along, unconsciously, only asking group thinkers and fans for input, driven by a misguided and dangerous perceived need for peace and pace rather than quality and challenge.

Action

The job of a great moderator is to even out the debate and include a wider base of people, delivering a more diverse and representative contribution – Sampling a diversity of opinion and actively encouraging the quieter sources of wisdom to share their contribution, speak up and be heard.

  1. Good Conflict.

Many companies employ “nice” people who are expected to be “nice”. What actually happens is they become avoidant and this allows stupider ideas to become policy in action, leading to disaster.

Action

Promote the licensed critic, the robust challenger and include different opinions (and integrate these exotic gems via the process of reconciliation.) The smart move is to establish a protocol for allowed any civilised challenge within a robust but protected environment, to produce better suggestions, better processes, more considered solutions and a better customer experience. All this is done to generate improved products, services and engagement, the end result of which, will be experienced in higher income and healthier levels of profit.

  1. Capture collaboration in a charter    How many great training initiatives generated on a Friday are quietly killed off at the 8.30AM reporting meeting on a Monday? A. Most of them. It is easier to let innovation, change and challenge die on the vine and to go back to those old habits that are, actually not serving you well, but feel like an old pair of shoes – At least familiar. The problem is, they represent a slow company suicide.

Action

The formulation of a charter for collaborative team behaviours, formed collaboratively. Is that too obvious? It does not start with a stone tablet issuing from the CEO’s office. It does not come from an expensive off-site weekend jolly for Directors only. It comes from the floor. It evolves. It represents the voice and heart of everybody. And, it is signed up to by everybody – Volunteers stepping up, not coerced group thinkers just nodding along.

About the Author – Matthew Hill is a facilitator, trainer, writer, and public speaker, working with UK and International teams to get them beyond their blockages to create durable results in an exciting peer-to-peer atmosphere of exchange, fairness and excellence.

Contact Matthew on 075 40 65 9995 for a short conversation.

Like and share

“A blank slate? Brain Science and Cultures” Florence, 4 – 6th April 2019

Roberto Ruffino reminds us that registration is now open for this important International conference taking place in Florence on 4th to 6th April 2019, Please visit the conference site;

PROGRAMME  – A BLANK SLATE?

NEUROSCIENZE E CULTURE / BRAIN SCIENCE AND CULTURES

AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Florence Firenze, 4th-6th April 2019 

Thursday 4th April (3.00-6.00 pm) – Inaugural session

Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento

Roberto Ruffino, Fondazione Intercultura                    Benvenuto/Welcome

Issues about the transfer of culture

Steven Pinker, Harvard University                                The Blank Slate  (video presentation)

Lamberto Maffei, Università di Pisa                            Guardare, vedere, immagini del tempo

Peter Richerson, University of California                     Not by Genes Alone: How Culture

Transformed Human Evolution

Martin Gessmann, Hochschule fur Gestaltung                         Mind Meets Brain: The True Impact of Neuroscience Offenbach am Main                                                     on Philosophy

Mai Nguyen Phuong Mai, Amsterdam University          There is no blank slate. The role of genes,

neurons, behaviour and geography in the

reshaping of cultures

Panel Discussion (9.00 pm)

Firenze, Hotel Mediterraneo, Centro Congressi

Milton Bennett IDRI Institute – Ying-yi Hong, Chinese University of Hong Kong:

A debate “Culture, Cognition, and Consciousness”

Friday 5th April (all day) – Parallel Workshops

Firenze, Hotel Mediterraneo, Centro Congressi

09.00 -11.00 – We are all human beings

Shalom H. Schwartz, University of Jerusalem              Universal values across cultures

Lilach Sagiv, Hebrew University Jerusalem

Richard Nisbett, University of Michigan                      Culture, genes and intelligence

Andrea Moro, Scuola Univ Sup. IUSS Pavia                Sintassi, cervello e lingue impossibili

Alberto Piazza, Università di Torino                            La conservazione della memoria genetica

Giuseppe Mantovani, Universià di Padova                  L’educazione interculturale al tempo dei sovranismi

con Simone Giusti                                                     Storia globale e traduzione nella scuola

Mark Pagel, University of Reading                               Origins of the Human Social Mind

Adriano Favole, Università di Torino                           Nature e Culture: l’irriducibile pluralità

Stefano Allovio, Università Statale di Milano              dell’umano

11.30 -13.30 – Cultures and the unconscious

Sudhir Kakar, Psychoanalyst, Goa                               Cultures and Psyche

Paolo Inghilleri, Università di Milano                          La cultura e i geni non si trasmettono da soli:

il ruolo della mente

Hannah Monyer, University of Heidelberg                   Brain Plasticity and Memory

Giacomo Rizzolatti, Università di Parma                       La doppia vita delle espressioni emozionali

Fausto Caruana, Università di Parma

Neil Levy, Macquarie University           Sydney              Neuro-ethics

Shinobu Kitayama, University of Michigan                    Interaction between culture and brain

Romano Madera, Universita di Milano Bicocca             Dalla pseudospeciazione al capro espiatorio

15.00 -17.00 – Cervello, coscienza, culture/Brain, consciousness and cultures

David Sloane Wilson, Binghamton University              Cultural evolution is a blank slate in the same way                                                                              as other evolutionary processes

Joseph Shaules, Juntedo University                            A Deep Culture Approach to Intercultural Learning:                                                                            Culture Cognition and the Intuitive Mind

Milena Santerini, Università Cattolica Milano             Educazione morale e neuroscienze

Franco Fabbro, Università di Udine                             Basi neuropsicologiche dell’esperienza religiosa

Marcello Massimini, Università di Milano                    Definire e misurare il valore dello stato di coscienza

Guido Barbujani, Università di Ferrara                                    L’invenzione delle razze

Saturday 6th April (morning) – Plenary session

Firenze, Hotel Mediterraneo, Centro Congressi

  • Video-summary of items from previous day’s                                                                           workshops
  • Dialogo su culture, cervello, geni e valori/ A dialogue                                                                        on cultures, brain, genes and values:
  • Ian Tattersall, NY Museum of Natural History
  • Susanna Mantovani, Università di Milano Bicocca
  • Francesco Cavalli Sforza, Università San Raffaele di Milano

12.00-13.00                                                                 Wrap up and Conclusions

  • Roberto Toscano, Presidente Fondazione Intercultura